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I have to design a business card for my company.

The logos are in PNG format, the business card is going to be 90mm by 50mm and the logos are about 400px × 400px. I'm using cmyk colors to print the business card.

Would these logos cause a problem in terms of them getting blurried out and pixelated when printed? Or maybe the colors change drastically when printed because it is PNG?

And if the text in the PNG logo was black (probably not 100%k and has other channels as c,m and y) would that cause any problem?

I'm designing the business card in Photoshop, what can I do If I can't use the PNG logo?

I have included one of the PNG logos.

Thanks

enter image description here

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    I do not believe PNG will support CMYK color.. a CMYK PNG doesn't exist.
    – Scott
    Jun 10, 2023 at 10:55
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    If you care about your brand, please care about your brand. If a medic is an expert in their field, why don't you value an expert in design? You say the logos are 400x400 px when the logo has a different proportion and you have it more than 1200px in height. You say that is PNG when PNG does not accept CMYK. You do not need CMYK. You need either RGB or spot inks, depending on the printing method you are going to use. Why are you using Photoshop to do that job? I'll try to write an answer later. But sending the project to a designer will be a better option for you.
    – Rafael
    Jun 10, 2023 at 16:28
  • I will update on this question later, I'm going to use illustrator. I will post all details Jun 13, 2023 at 9:06
  • The whole idea of color management is that it is possible to convert between color systems and color spaces. There is nothing wrong with converting RGB colors to CMYK. It's done all the time everywhere. If the Logo only exists in RGB format, there will be nothing to compare it to for it to differ... Printing processes are not exact anyway. Colors change drastically when printed not because of the digital color system used, but because you change medium from screen to paper. Jun 16, 2023 at 12:02

1 Answer 1

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  1. Somebody should try to find a vector format of that logo, by the way it looks I'm assuming it is made using a vector application, so somewhere there should be a vector version made by somebody in the past for this client.
  2. Or, you have the option to rebuild this logo in a vector app, like Illustrator, with the proper skills you can get a 95% identical version in 30 minutes.
  3. Or, risk it and print with what you have. You can always do a few test prints and see what it looks like on paper, before ordering the actual cards. For business card usage, this existing logo can be relatively ok.

ps. I am not sure why anybody in 2023 would design business cards in Photoshop, and print them in CMYK, with the availability, speed and costs we now have with digital printing. Use vector apps for anything that goes to print, and only use CMYK if you have what it takes for that. You are really taking the complicated path imho.

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  • Can I do a test using the regular printers used at home? Jun 10, 2023 at 11:51
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    Yes, why not .. plug it in, see what happens. If you have the time and budget, find a street corner print shop, pay 5$ and print a few copies on their machines, see what happens. Wild guessing there is absolutely no need for this to be printed in CMYK.
    – Lucian
    Jun 10, 2023 at 11:53
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    @kareenramzi - note that most consumer grade home/office inkjet printers can't actually print CMYK image files properly. They can generally only print RGB image files properly - the colours will likely be off if you try printing a CMYK image file.
    – Billy Kerr
    Jun 10, 2023 at 12:10
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    IMHO: There is really only one good reason to print in CMYK, for this use case, and that is if you need to match the k black text in your vectors.
    – joojaa
    Jun 10, 2023 at 19:18

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