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I have image1 and image2. Image1 is screenshot from the display 3800x1900 with a device scale factor 2.25. The second image2 is a screenshot from the display 1800x900 with a device scale factor 1.

When checked dimensions (resolution), it's almost the same. Yet the first image is twice as big as the second one at 100% when viewed through an image viewer. The size though is also almost twice as big. All over the internet they say the dimensions define the size, but the dimensions in this case is almost the same.

I'm trying to understand what drives that difference. Looking for a technical answer.

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

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    Hi. I'm not sure why this is surprising to you. The image fg.jpg is almost a square. The image t.jpg is a rectangle, which is much wider than it is high. Its height is almost half the the height of the image t.jpg The sizes are certainly not almost the same.
    – Billy Kerr
    Nov 22, 2023 at 15:14
  • What are you actually trying to achieve here? Do you want the pie chart to be the same apparent size in both images? If so, you could do this in an image editor such as Photoshop or GIMP, and scale the larger image down, using guides to match the size of the pie chart. see example. Here images 1 and 2 are shown at their original size, image 3 is scaled down such that the pie chart is the same size in both images.
    – Billy Kerr
    Nov 22, 2023 at 15:46
  • @BillyKerr, hey, so are you saying that the pie chart looks twice as small because of the difference height 914 vs 1703? Nov 22, 2023 at 15:52
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    yeah also, you say they are both screenshots of two differently sized but same aspect ratio, but they can't be, since they are not the same shape
    – Yorik
    Nov 22, 2023 at 15:57
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    @max Yes, the images are completely different sizes, different aspect ratios - not just in height, but also in width, but the smallest dimension (the smallest height) is the limiting factor. You can't fit the big pie chart in the same space as the smaller image without rescaling it.
    – Billy Kerr
    Nov 22, 2023 at 16:14

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