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How do I convert a raster image (like JPG and PNG) into a vector one and back again without losing quality? Is it possible to resize a vector image without quality loss, and it is true for raster ones as well?

For example, I have a 640x360 png file, and I want to resize to 1920x1080 without any quality loss. Is there a way I can do this?


I have a 1080p video and make an image sequence out of it using Shutter Encoder, but I switch the image scale to 640x360 from the source. How do I resize images using upscayl without upscaling them? Can Shutter Encoder (and/or ffmpeg) can resize images without losing quality?

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  • Again. This is an XY problem. You are not defining your real problem, process, or project. In this case, You do not need to vectorize it. You need to resample it. Download futuretools.io/tools/upscayl
    – Rafael
    Apr 10 at 1:16
  • How about this? I have a 1080p video and make an image sequence out of it using Shutter Encoder, but I switch the image scale to 640x360 from the source. How do I resize images using upscayl without upscaling them? Can Shutter Encoder (and/or ffmpeg) can resize images without losing quality? Apr 10 at 1:20
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    This seems obvious.. if you have a 1080p video don't downsize it when exporting an image sequence.
    – Scott
    Apr 10 at 4:07
  • Why do you want to convert it to vector? A vector image will be substantially lower quality than the original, and would involve auto tracing in vector software. Whatever you are trying to do here, this is NOT a suitable method. It's sounds like you want to resample a video to make it larger. Also you can't do this without some quality loss anyway. It's simply not possible. Resampling raster images always results in some quality loss.
    – Billy Kerr
    Apr 10 at 10:31
  • This is a chicken vs egg, which came first problem.
    – Lucian
    Apr 10 at 10:43

2 Answers 2

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The answer is the same as the other post. Use Virtual Dub 2. It has filters to resample the video.

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If you want to upscale individual images use Upscaly. https://www.futuretools.io/tools/upscayl


But try not to downsample the images in the first place.

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The answer to your question is tentatively: No. The answer to this question is is dependent on how you define quality. And if your asking then the answer is almost certainly no.

But look at the situation in a different but similar case. So you want to move something heavy, well you can cut it into pieces. Then throw 8 of 9 pieces away because 1/9 of it is even easier to move. Ok so you cart them away and then start thinking of how to rebuild the thing. Well, okay, easiest would have been to not break it in the first place. Second would have been to have all pieces, but then you would need to worry about seams between pieces. But hey it is possible to reconstruct also from some of the pieces, it involves a lot of work and lot of guessing.

So why dont we do this? Well because its not a terribly good workflow. Its error prone. But in fact we would like to do this everywhere. Why well mainly because it would make you rich. Every streaming operator, every cloud provider every network operator would want to do this (lots of physical construction too) because it would allow them to sell more for less resources.

So yes, if it can be upscaled by preserving quality, go for it. But it probably can not.

But it would be more constructive to ask about your actual problem. Not the problem you have caused yourself at 2 steps down the line. ask about the starting point to end goal not intermediaty step.

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