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I want to start creating .gifs. So I have gif here which consists four single pictures. I import it in GIMP 2.10.30 and can see these pictures. Now I add just one single brushstroke, but when I export it, the color is completely spread over the picture.

Here is my before and after gif. I added a green line over the key in picture 3. enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • If your image is still in Indexed mode, you really need to do Image > Mode > RGB first or you won't be able to edit the colours properly, then use Filters > Animation > Unoptimize. Then paint in your additions, then export as GIF again.
    – Billy Kerr
    Commented May 22 at 9:44

2 Answers 2

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Your GIF is "optimized", in others words, frames only encode the difference from the previous frame and only overlay the changed pixels in the current image (this is why layers are marked as (combine)).

enter image description here

before you edit the image, de-optimize it with Filters > Animation > Unoptimize:

enter image description here

Now all the layers are complete, and you can edit the image.

Once you are done editing, since the layers are marked (replace), each frame will completely replace the current image. You can re-optimize before export using Filters > Animation > Optimize (for GIF). This can reduce the file size if this produces significant areas of transparent pixels.

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If what you did is this. Draw colors on the bottom layer.

enter image description here

It is pretty obvious that would happen, because the top layers have some zones transparent.

enter image description here

So you are seeing what is below.

enter image description here


As you need solid layers. I would duplicate the bottom one.

enter image description here

Intercalate the full frame below each current layer and merge them down.

enter image description here


Additionally, depending on the file I would convert the file to RGB, save a "working file" (GIF is an output file), and convert back to indexed when I want to test the file.


That file has serious optimization problems. The fact that you can see so many of each layer indicates that pixels that should not been on that layer are.

The only pixels that should be on each layer are the moving objects. The hand and the face and feet.

On RGB mode I would make a transparent mask, use a hard brush, and eliminate everything that is not supposed to be there.

enter image description here


The bottom line is that you DO not use an animated gif as a working file.

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    This should be done with Filters > Animation> Unoptimize which is exactly designed for this.
    – xenoid
    Commented May 19 at 20:59
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    I did not know that filter. It automatizes the first part I do not mind the downvote. I normally use it for answers that do not solve a problem, not in the case that there is a better way to do it n_n
    – Rafael
    Commented May 20 at 5:49
  • But still, the second part needs to be addressed. This animated gif has to me remastered removing all the parts that do not have a clear animation.
    – Rafael
    Commented May 20 at 5:49
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    "I do not mind the downvote". Ain't me 😇. The problem is that the dithering that is redone when you convert back to indexed will not have identical results(*) on identical areas (south-east of any actually different pixels). So pixels that are identical before the dithering end up different and aren't optimized out (and produce an ever changing animation background). (*) Unless you use the Positioned option that uses a fixed pattern...
    – xenoid
    Commented May 20 at 6:58
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    Notably, Filters > Animation > Optimize (GIF) doesn't handle the second part of this answer.
    – wizzwizz4
    Commented May 20 at 14:45

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