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This question is a follow-up of should I look into different graphic design softwares

I am starting to use Inkscape now, like many have suggested in that post.

How do I practice it?

I mean in GIMP I just started designing right away and learned along the way, But still I feel like I don't use ALL the features of GIMP properly, I was hoping to avoid the same situation in Inkscape. Is there anyway to practice properly like first practice drawing all the geometrical shapes, then shading... like that? Thanks.

closed as too broad by Scott, DᴀʀᴛʜVᴀᴅᴇʀ, Yisela Aug 18 '13 at 20:24

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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This could possibly be opinion-based, but I've found the best way to learning software and also the best way towards teaching software has two facets. There is the technical ability required to move throughout the software and there is the functional ability to use the software as tool for your creativity.

Often times, I've found people immediately jump in to tutorials without having a base ability to understand what exactly it is they are doing and why. When this happens it hinders the ability to build upon knowledge. On the opposite end of the spectrum there are people who want to learn everything about the software even though there isn't practicality in using all of it.

The balance between the technical and functional is the key to having expertise in any software.

Once you have a solid knowledge base you can build upon that knowledge and connect the dots easier. Then, I feel it is a matter of experimentation. Find things you want to create and learn the process involved in doing it; whether it be tutorials, asking questions, or tinkering by yourself. Then as you figure out a technique, streamline your process and incorporate it into your workflow. Repeat.

I've always thought of learning technical skills as adding arrows to your quiver. Each time you learn a technique or create something new, you have yet another way to attack a problem.