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Can i know how to check the license of the Baskerville True Type font that is available on my laptop running Mac OS. Is the Baskerville.ttc font free to use commercially ?

If not can i still use the font for creating the logo for a website?

I saw a similar query for chancery font on stackexchange, but i just wanted to be sure on this..

Can I commercially use a logo that was made using URW Chancery L?

  • Im based out of India. I would like to know how i can check what is the licensing option for the Baskerville.ttc font that is available on the mac OS box. i dont see any option in Fontbook.app. Any further tips would be great. What about a common typeface like Times New Roman. How can i check its license details ? – Ron Abraham May 7 '14 at 12:28
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Any font that comes bundled with your operating system is provided under the EULA that comes with the OS. In all cases currently (2014), a font that is bundled with the OS is licensed for use in any project, commercial or otherwise. That includes logos.

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Depends on the licence and the applicable law in the territory concerned, neither of which you have stated. In the UK, using a font does not infringe its copyright.

Every font should have a licence that tells you exactly what you can do or cannot do using this font. Some fonts require that you mention the author, some require that you buy a licence if it's going to be used for commercial work. If you are uncertain, you'd better contact the author of the font.

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  • I feel this is true of individual fonts that a user may buy or download from a font site, but not applicable to fonts that come installed on your OS. It may get tricky however, when you've got for example Helvetica on your Mac but you don't have it on your PC or Linux machine where you're doing work (for whatever reason). – Rick Henderson Apr 17 '17 at 2:42

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