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I remember a few years ago I watched or read a tutorial that showed me how I can use the clone stamp tool with a static source point.

What I mean is that the source we indicate with the alt button should stay only on one place while we copy this to other areas of our subject/canvas.

How can I make the source that I set for the clone stamp tool static, so that it doesn't move while I'm copying/painting it on other areas?

7

There's no way I know of to actually pin the source to a single specific spot, it always moves with the tool as you paint. But you can always start from the same source point.

If you unchecked Aligned in the Control Bar the source always starts from the same location.

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  • i dont see any difference when i check and uncheck the aligned.. do i miss something? May 14 '14 at 22:13
  • 1
    The difference is when you lift the tool and stop painting.... then start painting again.. the source goes back to the original spot.
    – Scott
    May 14 '14 at 22:17
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You could define a pattern ( select the source area - Modify > Define a pattern ) and then you could use the Clone Stamp Pattern

-1

There's no way I know of to actually pin the source to a single specific spot, it always moves with the tool as you paint. But you can always start from the same source point.

If you unchecked Aligned in the Control Bar the source always starts from the same location.

This is a great answer, but I have some more to add to explain why it works this way.

How can I make the source that I set for the clone stamp tool static, so that it doesn't move while I'm copying/painting it on other areas?

If you copied from a static point constantly it would create strange patterns. This can be avoided by "spacing" out the cloning action. Simply clicking repeatedly accomplishes this "spacing" action and gives you better control over it.

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  • 1
    Your first not yellow line should be better a comment to the answer I guess? What is ment with "spacing"? Can you show a screenshot?
    – Mensch
    Oct 11 '15 at 1:27
-1

In GIMP 2.10 you can choose Alignment: Fixed from the dropdown of Alignment options. Default value is None which is where the clone selection moves with you.

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  • Welcome to Graphic Design Stack Exchange - please take a look around tour to get a sense of who we are as a community. Also take a look at How to Ask and How to Answer questions. You can also look at help center to understand how we prefer to behave as a community. Please note that OP's query contained a specific application in the title and the tags - so though your answer addresses the process issue well if working in GIMP, it won't be easily found. Frame challenges can be good, but it's best to think about how / why this answer might be found and seen to benefit later askers. Jan 23 '19 at 16:16
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    I did notice the OP asked about Photoshop, but I was using GIMP and this ticket pointed me to the right feature in GIMP because it uses the same terminology as Photoshop. Convenient cross pollination, answering one answers both.
    – xref
    Jan 23 '19 at 20:06
  • To comply with SO policies, it could be a comment instead of an answer though. Good job anyway, might be handy for someone else. Jan 25 '19 at 11:16
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If you have the tool set to aligned mode, this establishes a fixed relationship between the source and destination points. If the clone stamp is set to the non-aligned mode, the source point remains the same and the clone stamp will keep sampling from the same spot until you Option/Alt-click again to establish a new source point.

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  • kinda the same as what Scott said 2 years ago...
    – Luciano
    Sep 22 '16 at 8:16
-3

I remember in an older version of CS, back in the beginning of CS, the clone tool could be static or it could move. The user simply had to indicate a preference. That feature seems to have been removed.

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  • 1
    Review my answer, the feature hasn't been removed at all.
    – Scott
    May 8 '15 at 16:58
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