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Text layers in Photoshop will auto-update the layer name with the text content of the layer unless you manually edit the layer name in the layers panel. Then it retains the manually entered layer name. How would one go about restoring this auto-updating of the layer name to a layer whose name has been manually edited?

  • Well if you create the exact layer anew then it would retain this feature. This could be scripted pretty easily. – joojaa Jun 14 '14 at 19:31
  • Interesting issue. To my knowledge there isn't a way to go back to the live title after you've renamed the layer. It'll be interesting to see if anyone comes up with anything for you. – GoofyMonkey Jun 14 '14 at 19:51
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    Copy text, create new text layer, paste text. Delete previous text layer. – Scott Jun 14 '14 at 19:52
  • Obviously I could recreate the layer, but that is not an ideal solution. Especially with a layer containing more than just plain text on a layer. I'm curious how one would script this process, and for those of us with zero scripting skills, it's not so easy. – George C Jun 15 '14 at 22:58
  • Also, easier than @Scott, you can duplicate the layer and rename the layer as you wish in the window that pops up and then delete the first layer. – MagTun Nov 19 '14 at 9:23
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After searching for the same thing for longer than I want to admit I tried this and it worked:

  1. ctrl + j - duplicate layer
  2. Edit text and commit changes; watch the layer name autoupdate
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    Hi David, welcome to GDSE and thanks for your answer. I have edited it to take out the elaborate and unnecessary joke. People visit the Stack Exchange network to get answers to their questions. The occasional joke can be included, but 70% of the answer is a bit much. Keep contributing though and please do drop into Graphic Design Chat where we welcome jokes with open arms. – PieBie Dec 14 '16 at 10:15
  • This does not work for me on Photoshop CS6. – George C Dec 15 '16 at 17:03
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Rename is sticky. It relates to the internal data structures that Photoshop is using and how these things are represented. Once you've named the layer, it's no longer, um, virgin text, and there's no way back. (Every possible extension of that metaphor is accurate but ranges from risque to crude, so I'll leave it at that.)

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For Mac Photoshop CC 2017, use command-j to duplicate the layer, then delete the old layer. The duplicate layer name will auto-update.

protected by DᴀʀᴛʜVᴀᴅᴇʀ Feb 14 at 21:57

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