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See this image:

enter image description here http://soranootoshimono.wikia.com/wiki/File:46456845235358656364.png

To me it look soft like some sort of low-pass filter but I also can see sharp edge of the image.

I'm curious what make it look softer than others.
And if you can make one from a normal image I also want to know how can you do that?

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  • Just looks like a slight blur over the entire image to me...I don't see a "sharp edge" anywhere..... either that or my eyes are going.
    – Scott
    Commented Jun 21, 2014 at 23:37
  • @Scott I understand your point I feel the same It's some thing like !Donald but I think there are other ingredients not just blurriness. Commented Jun 22, 2014 at 5:06
  • Well, you're going to need to describe what you mean by "soft" if you aren't referring to the blur. All I see is a surface blur over everything.
    – Scott
    Commented Jun 22, 2014 at 5:28
  • @Scott I'm trying to reproduce the result. If we assume it's just a surface blur: Which window function used to generate this kind of blur? I tried Gaussian without success probably because of the way I mixed blurred layer into the image but I don't think Gaussian is the right one. Commented Jun 22, 2014 at 6:04

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The colours are not soft as such, though they are pastels; but the shadows are simply a darker version of the "original", and there are careful use of highlights. Consider the clothes:

enter image description here

The outlines are trad cartoon-black. If you removed the shadows and kept the black outlines, you would have old-school-western donald-duck-style cartoon.

Really old Donald Duck, has the shadows as an "overlay" of gray-to-black:

enter image description here

"Modern" (well, to me anyway) versions do the same as manga: shadows are just darker colours of the highlights, hence the softness:

enter image description here


Edit: In response to some of the comment; I actually do not see a blur. What I do see, is outlines that are not entirely black, and in some cases, the outline colour is adjusted to fit the "content" of that object. Note that some of the outlines are brown-ish, others are blue-ish etc.

I could of course be wrong.

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