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I'm designing a clothing brand logo and it uses a 3D children's toy block. We've looked at other clothing logos but none are in 3D. Is it ok to use a 3D object in a clothing brand logo?

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    Yes, it's quite fine. The only thing I'd make sure though, is that the logo ends up being vector in the end, rather than a raster image of a 3D rendering. Which would often mean that if you originally make it in 3D application, you'd potentially need to recreate it or at least finalize it in something like Illustrator. – Joonas Jul 2 '14 at 7:09
  • I've made it in illustrator so its vector, using the extrude bevel function with mapped sides. do you know any examples of good logos that use 3d? – Thomas Jul 2 '14 at 7:36
  • Off the top of my head I can't think of many, but let's see: The previous pepsi logo used to be 3D, A really old pepsi logo used to be a bottle cap from a perspective, AT & T, Sony Ericsson, Rhino 3D, Solidworks logo used to be a 3d cube, Cinema 4D, SketchUp, Volkswagen, Citroen, Audi. – Joonas Jul 2 '14 at 7:54
  • @Joonas, why isn't that an answer? I'd +1 it. – Vincent Jul 2 '14 at 9:19
  • @Bakabaka Because reasons... Fine, I'll make it into an answer, but it's not going to be a good one. – Joonas Jul 2 '14 at 10:17
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My comment as an answer:

Yes, it's quite fine.

The only thing I'd make sure though, is that the logo ends up being vector in the end, rather than a raster image of a 3D rendering.

Which would often mean that if you originally make it in 3D application, you'd potentially need to recreate it or at least finalize it in something like Illustrator.


Depenping on how much of a 3D look I'm going for, I would use a 3D rendering as my "guide" to recreate it in Illustrator ( Just a quick render ) or just a 3D model converted into 2D line drawing. If possible, I would use both methods together.

  • Or you can just let your 3D application render vector art. – joojaa Jul 2 '14 at 11:17
  • @joojaa Mmmaybe, but it's not always an option or ideal. – Joonas Jul 2 '14 at 11:31
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You also want to have a good understanding of all the mediums where the logo is going to be used. For instance, on the web or 4-color printing, where the skies the limit for color, a 3D logo isn't an issue.

However, if the client wants the logo inside the shirt (where the size goes), or screen printed on the front of a shirt, a 3D logo would be expensive to produce.

My suggestion is to make a 3D logo that also has a compelling flat version of it, in case the client has to pay-per-color. You also want to make sure it can be produced in black and white.

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