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I'm trying to do some research into these types of logos but I can't find anything of use on Google using the buzzwords - 'Cross logo', 'X logo', 'X with text around logo'. Is there a certain name for this design?

example logo

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There's not really a formal name but you can find it as Crossed X logo. Or just Crossed logo but that will yield more diverse results, namely including those with religious crosses as well.

The design originally stems from New York Hard Core (NYHC), as described in this terrific article 22 Iconic Music Logos Explained

NYHC Logo

Nowadays its frequently associated with "hipster branding," as evident by these resources:

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    I don't have a handy example, but I'm fairly sure that I have seen such logos used for 100+ year old organizations, and that it's rather unlikely that the design "originally stems" from something as late as the 1980'ies. But maybe I'm mistaken, need to look for examples. – Peteris Nov 10 '14 at 20:44
  • Of course, Hamburg American Clock Company used similar in the 1980s. But the modern trend comes from the NYHC. Regardless the question was for a way to search for it, the historical background was extra :) @Peteris – Ryan Nov 10 '14 at 20:54
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It's a pig pen cipher used for encryption/decryption. It's on old coins. This is nothing new, and it's not from some NY hXc... They aren't OG.

http://www.newworldtreasures.com/images/pillarswaves.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/36/Pigpen_cipher_key.svg

  • NY hXc means "New York Hard Core" and refers to another answer, "OG" means "original gangster" – Jobjörn Folkesson Aug 27 '16 at 17:19
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I think the well known railroad crossing sign (R X R) cannot be ignored here. Many places which employ this logotype, as mentioned above, only have letters on the sides. Some also include an enclosing circle.

The RR crossing symbol is something that's in the public consciousness, but people don't probably think of it immediately when they see a logo for a bar or beard wax store or leather goods shop.

The sign dates to the 1920s/1930s. The design was standardized in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, (MUTCD) adopted in 1935.

RR-crossing-classic RR-crossing-barsonly

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    What does this have to do with the question being asked? – Zach Saucier Mar 14 '16 at 17:31
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    Hey afwaller, can you explain a little further how this information will help the person who asked the question? I tried searching for "Railroad Crossing Logo" and all I got were railroad signs, not examples of logos using that type of layout. I encourage you to edit your question and improve upon it! – Vicki Mar 15 '16 at 0:48

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