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Given a square image, how can I crop, at the exact center, of the image?

What if the image is not square itself?

What if I'm using Photoshop CS6 or some older version?
Is the procedure the same?

13

If your image is not square:

  1. Choose View > New Guide then tick the Vertical option and enter 50% in the box and click OK.
  2. Choose View > New Guide then tick the Horizontal option and enter 50% in the box and click OK.

This provides a guide intersection at the image center.

  1. Grab the Marquee Selection Tool or the Crop Tool, hold down the Option/Alt and Shift key and click-drag starting at that center guide intersection.

This draws a square selection (crop area) at the center of the image.

  1. Then simply choose Image > Crop, or hit the Enter to commit the crop (if using the crop tool)

If the image itself is square...

  1. Choose Select > All from the menu.
  2. Then choose Select > Modify > Contract
  3. Tick the Apply effect from Canvas Bounds box and enter the amount of offset, from the canvas edge, you want and click OK.
  4. Then simply choose Image > Crop

For versions of Photoshop where "contract" may not be available after selecting all, use the first method.

  • At the exact centre of an image – Pippo Jan 2 '15 at 20:36
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    Is the image itself square? More info in the question wouldn't hurt :) – Scott Jan 2 '15 at 20:37
  • Sorry :) Yes, it is – Pippo Jan 2 '15 at 20:38
  • I cannot choose Contract when everything is selected. In any case, thanks for your help. I just find a bit crazy that this apparently simple operation must be such a pain... – Pippo Jan 2 '15 at 20:45
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    You must be using an older version of Photoshop... Again, more info in the question is never a bad thing. :) – Scott Jan 2 '15 at 20:45
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A simple method that works in all programs is to add another layer, and create a line from the upper left to the lower right corners, and the same for upper right to lower left. You can then select all, scale selection, and line it up on these lines. This will crop to the same aspect ratio, with a different overall size.

Like this: enter image description here

While hardly being an elegant solution, it has the advantage of working on any platform.

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