2

This is an example of what I mean by outline font:

enter image description here

I would like to make an outlined version of Gotham using Photoshop.

  • White fill, black stroke. You can't create fonts with Photoshop, you can only change the appearance of fonts you have. – Scott Jan 6 '15 at 19:42
6

While you can just add an outline, that is not the preferred way to do it. The preferred way is:

  • set the type (and convert to outlines if need be)
  • give the type an outline twice the thickness you want
  • duplicate this type (so it makes a copy directly on top)
  • set this duplicate type to not have any border, and whatever fill color you want

The reason for this method is that is perfectly preserves the shape of the letterforms that the original type designer created. It also prevents thin areas from becoming filled in or serifs closing up and the like.

If the outline is thin, just adding a stroke is usually fine, but for medium to thick outlines, you want to use this method instead.

enter image description here

2

Just add an outline to the font, or, better still do it in illustrator and create an outline.

  • Can you please explain how to do what you said? Or visualise it with one or more images? – Mensch Jan 6 '15 at 22:13
  • I was going to suggest Illustrator, type -> convert to outlines, then just set a stroke colour. Of course you won't get an actual font out the other end, just a vector. – superluminary Jan 8 '15 at 10:44
0

If you actually want to create a font file you can use like any other font, Photoshop won’t help you, because that’s not its purpose. However, but most font-creation programs should do.

In particular in FontForge (which is free), the following should do what you want:

  1. Load the original font.
  2. Element → Font Info → Layers.
  3. Select Stroked Font, set the Stroke Width as desired and OK.
  4. File → Generate Fonts.

Be careful with distributing the altered font though, as this may be a copyright infringement.

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