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I'm really new to Photoshop, but I use Indesign and Illustrator regularly. I have a picture of a product (books basically) that have a white background and I need that background to be transparent. I used the quick selection tool to select all the white space, then selected the inverse, cut and paste into a new file with a transparent background. When I do this the image ends up looking different-- kinda grainy, ragged edges. What is the best way to change the background to transparent without losing the image quality?

Here are links to the photos

Original:

enter image description here

source

After trying to remove background:

enter image description here

source

marked as duplicate by Zach Saucier, Vincent, Scott adobe-photoshop Mar 27 '15 at 17:11

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  • Regarding the "kinda grainy", it looks like you have applied some Photoshop layer effects. Mostly boosting the saturation or pasting into a different color space. I can't notice much different in grain at that image size. For the jagged edges take a look at this thread: graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/50170/…. – AndrewH Mar 26 '15 at 16:20
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To soften the edge, try Feathering the selection before doing the deletion.

Once your selection is made, press Shift+F6 (Or Select...Modify Selection...Feather) and choose a radius of 1px. Then do your deletion - it will be softer around the edges.

Here's what I got with your image: source

Another option is using the "Refine Edge" tool (located on the right side of the toolbar at top when using any of the selection tools). It will let you preview what your selected content will look like (over white, over black, over transparent) and make a multitude of adjustments to it (including feather, so you can preview different options).

Here's what it looks like: refine edge options

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I realize that you are new to Photoshop but you should learn to embrace the pen tool.

Photoshop Pen tool

It is no fun to use at first, but after practice it is your best friend when you need to be exact with your silos (silhouettes.) Take the time if you can to practice with it. It has been an invaluable tool in my design career.

And then I would follow others suggestions about feathering and modifying the selection.

Welcome to the world of a tedious but rewarding life in photo manipulation!

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