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This licence talks about software, can I apply it to a piece of art work (a logo)? I figure that some people on here would have used this licence for code/software so may have some experience

http://choosealicense.com/licenses/unlicense/

The above link shows a licence that makes a product free to use modify, distribute (software) under what looks like cc creative commons rather than c copywrite.

the licence reads:

This is free and unencumbered software released into the public domain.

Anyone is free to copy, modify, publish, use, compile, sell, or
distribute this software, either in source code form or as a compiled
binary, for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, and by any
means.

In jurisdictions that recognize copyright laws, the author or authors
of this software dedicate any and all copyright interest in the
software to the public domain. We make this dedication for the benefit
of the public at large and to the detriment of our heirs and
successors. We intend this dedication to be an overt act of
relinquishment in perpetuity of all present and future rights to this
software under copyright law.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND,
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT.
IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR
OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE,
ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR
OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

For more information, please refer to <http://unlicense.org>

Is this the correct licence to use if I want to make something pulic domain, free to use, modify what ever(legally do what ever you want with it licence)?

Would it be seen as legal, if not what would be the official way to declare the work as legally free for anyone to use?

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When you want to make your work "free and available" to anyone online you should mention how it is free. It is not a term of use nor a copyright. It is simply "access to knowledge".

You have 6 licenses in Creative Commons and all are related to any work not only software. You can choose how to make your work available in specific way. And there is an online tool to help you choose the license that you want: http://creativecommons.org/choose/

  1. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
  2. Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-ND 4.0)
  3. Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)
  4. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
  5. Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)
  6. Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

Creative Commons Licences are also available in many countries, adapted to their internal law. But as CC team mentioned, it will be one international license starting from version 4.0

After you choose the license you want, you may copy and paste the code generated by the chooser into your website.

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    +1 One other thing worth mentioning is, Creative Commons is specifically designed for creative work and cover all the various little legal quirks specific to creative work, whereas software licenses are specifically designed for software and cover legal quirks related to software. – user56reinstatemonica8 Mar 31 '15 at 8:45
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    Your list of CC licenses is missing CC0, which seems to be the one the OP wants. – TRiG Mar 31 '15 at 11:17
  • @TRiG this license it is no longer exist. it was one of the CC licenses since version 1.0 but they don't use it anymore. as it doesn't make any scene. if you want to make your work a public domain without any references and/or commercial restrictions .. so put it online in any website and that's it. what is equivalent to it is the (CC BY 4.0) – hsawires Mar 31 '15 at 11:27
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    It certainly does exist. From creativecommons.org/choose, select "Want public domain instead?" at the top of the page, and they promote it there. – TRiG Mar 31 '15 at 11:28

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