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I'm currently designing a logo in CYMK (in Illustrator CS6). The logo will be used in digital printing, web and for business cards. Is it correct to use CYMK or would it better to use colors from Pantone/HKS?

If CMYK is the correct choice, is it good to export the logo from Illustrator for web publishing? Is there something that I need to ensure that the colors remain the same as in CYMK?

marked as duplicate by Scott adobe-illustrator Apr 15 '15 at 15:52

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    Hello julmot, welcome to GDSE and thanks for your question. If you want to know more about the site, please see the help center or ping one of us in chat once your reputation is sufficient (20). Keep contributing and enjoy the site! – Zach Saucier Apr 15 '15 at 15:04
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It all depends, but often, for large branding projects, the logo may have a Pantone specification, a CMYK specification, and an RGB specification to handle all scenarios.

  • Ok and what is the best way to convert a logo that was creating in CYMK to all of this specifications? – dude Apr 15 '15 at 15:49
  • Just change color space in illustrator from CMYK to RGB (sRGB, really) and check your resulting colors. More link – Max Tokman Apr 15 '15 at 16:10
  • @julmot there's no 'one way' to convert between the color spaces. They are simply different color spaces and each software will have it's own way of converting between them. Your best bet is to convert and then tweak manually until you have it the way you want it visually. Trust your eyes. – DA01 Apr 15 '15 at 16:51
  • For example (from past experience): 3M. When printing the red 3M logo, there's a Pantone Coated option, Pantone Uncoated option, CMYK option, Black/White option and an RGB/Hex option. They would have all been manually chosen to match (as best they can). – DA01 Apr 15 '15 at 16:53
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    @julmot the advantage is that you can print more colors with pantone than CMYK and (often) you'll have a more consistent result across multiple printers. But in the end, if your client doesn't need Pantone, that's OK. CMYK is fine. – DA01 Apr 15 '15 at 19:24

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