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I'm implementing a fit visualiser which uses an existing product that the user owns to estimate the matching size to select when buying something.

The fit visualiser is is called "Virtusize". The client has suggested using their logo. However, using their logo is not required.

I find their suggested logo to be visually unclear to the user when referencing a "fit visualizer".

What would be the a visually clear way to represent "fit" in terms of apparel?

  • Hi Razor9012, welcome to GDSE and thanks for your question. I'm sorry to tell you that brainstorming, idea gathering and requests for free work are off-topic on this site. Therefore, your question might be closed soon. If you want to know more about the site, what questions to ask and how, please have a look at the help center. Keep contributing and enjoy the site! – Vincent May 20 '15 at 10:50
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    Your question might be hugely improved if you could turn it into a critique: show us something you have already tried, and why you found it lacking. Thanks for the effort and your understanding! – Vincent May 20 '15 at 10:52
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    Hi Razor9012, I've edited your question to hopefully make it more on-topic and useful to a wider range of users rather than just your site. If you feel my edits are incorrect, feel free to edit further yourself. I've also voted to reopen the question after the edits. – Scott May 21 '15 at 7:22
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I think representing the article of clothing as an indicator would work well. It's already what the user is shopping for, so I think it is clear that this would be used as a size indicator. You could express the right size for the user in 2 different ways. One idea would be to use as a badge with the right size displaying inside of the icon. The other way explicitly saying the recommended size in text below the icon. The icon would change with which ever piece of clothing the user is checking the size for.

This could be placed on top of the piece of clothing image the user is looking at. The indicator would display the suggested size inside of the of the clothing icon. You can further clarify the image with using a tooltip.

med size icon

Or you could even be more direct with the size indication by writing it out.

go with a

  • If the number of categories of clothing balloon you will need a default icon type or you wind up with 200 icons. Good for job security, but a hassle. Still, a good idea and can actually allow for different size top and bottom etc. (i.e. this works for pears AND apples) – Yorik May 21 '15 at 16:15
  • I can't really imagine using more than say 12 generic icons to describe the different clothing. I would not use the icon with the text on the icon already. The text and icon should be loaded separately & dynamically depending on the outcome. Better yet, make the icons SVG and you can do a lot more with them. – AndrewH May 21 '15 at 16:21
  • Yeah, I would envision this as a shape, compositing the text per icon/item. Color-coding the sizing might be appropriate, but avoid red and yellow. As far as ballooning categories, I meant over specifying: shorts, jorts, skorts,... – Yorik May 21 '15 at 16:25
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So this is obviously a long way from a real icon, but hopefully it shows you the idea:

sketch of concept

The idea being that you could share some kind of figure with some sort of article of clothing fitting over top of it.

  • Scaling this to an XXL wouldn't be very flattering :P – Zach Saucier Dec 13 '16 at 13:23
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With apparel, fit is about size and shape, (or cut.) Shape is more a characteristic of style, but I think you could use an icon that illustrates the size differences, (particularly with a tool called "VirtuSize".) I would consider something like this:

enter image description here

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