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I'm trying to find an easy way to search the internet for PDF vector images.

Update: using "free to use, share or modify, even commercially" filter

Google Image Search:

filetype:pdf spaceship

only brings up pdf document files

Google Image Search:

filetype:svg spaceship

does bring up vector images but not in the PDF format that I need.

If there isn't a way to search for PDF vectors is there a converter that will convert from SVG to vector PDF without losing quality on the Mac?


Update Thanks @WillAdams, he brought up good points about copyright, added license filter to post.

closed as off-topic by Scott, DA01, Hanna, Wrzlprmft, Zach Saucier Jul 6 '15 at 17:37

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This appears to be a tech support question about fixing technology to work as advertised. Please edit the question so that it pertains to using technology to solve a design problem. You may want to check if it hasn't already been asked in Super User. In many cases, contacting the manufacturer is the quickest option." – Scott, DA01, Hanna, Zach Saucier
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Please note that there are also a number of reputable art sites that specialize in vector art and have free or free with attribution art. Try Googling "free vector art" in the Web search. Make sure to check the sites out with Webutation or similar before using as there's a lot of bad people out there, but the first 5 or so I checked out came up clean. – jpheldson Jul 3 '15 at 14:16
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The problem is, there's no indexing of whether or no .pdf files contain either pixel or vector images.

One can open up a .pdf using Adobe Illustrator, Affinity Serif, (or Inkscape if one wants a free solution), &c., but one won’t know until opening up the file how what it contains is represented in the file.

Moreover, the contents of the image are separate from the licensing — just ’cause it’s on the web doesn't mean that you can open it, strip it out and use it. Please consider copyright.

If you want a vector image of a spaceship why not draw it yourself?

Or, since this is for education, why not learn how to create spaceships? Use the Open Vehicle Sketch Pad: http://openvsp.org/ — there’s a gallery of images, and it should be possible to export to a fileformat which can be converted into SVG.

Further, it's simple to convert a .pdf to .svg using Inkscape or some other tool.

  • You make some good points. I'm not trying to use the images commercially. I'm helping teach programming to high school students. The instructors don't have graphic design experience and we'd like to be able to use vector graphics for the iOS game they will be building. – Korey Hinton Jul 1 '15 at 13:47
  • So you're going to teach them that it's okay to just steal images, rather than creating their own? I'll bet long odds and family heirlooms that there's at least one kid in the class who has a notebook w/ spaceship doodles in the margins or on the cover --- set the kid up w/ a free copy of Inkscape and have him draw something. – WillAdams Jul 1 '15 at 14:20
  • Ok good point. I'm not going to teach them to steal images. I'll teach them about image licensing and about what software is out there if they want to draw images themselves and there will probably be a few that might want to draw it themselves. Thanks for your suggestions – Korey Hinton Jul 1 '15 at 15:28
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    For the students that want to search for images I will have them use advanced image search to make sure they aren't breaking copyright to find rasterized images. For those who would like to create their own vector images I will have them use the suggested software. Thanks – Korey Hinton Jul 1 '15 at 16:00

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