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I am a designer working on Mac OS X - I have created a CMYK .jpg graphic for print using InDesign. I printed it out and the colours appeared as expected.

I sent this graphic to my account manager - she has printed the image and the colours appear very differently both on screen and printed. We are concerned as we will be sending this to a client to use as a company wide footer graphic for MS Word.

Please help!

  • So many variables here...you both almost certainly have differently calibrated monitors. Did you use two separate printers? Was the stock you printed on the same from each? I mean, where to begin? Then there's the fact that you're printing a jpg... – Manly Jul 23 '15 at 16:40
  • I am adding some more to John's list. Does the file incude the profile? what aplications are you using to print it? are the printers calibrated? – Rafael Jul 23 '15 at 16:50
  • The story gets uglier... Word+Client+Printed by the client... – Rafael Jul 23 '15 at 16:52
  • Does Word even support CMYK jpeg? Or CMYK images in any format? – Yorik Jul 23 '15 at 20:18
  • @Yorik as far as I know, only Publisher supports CMYK. – Aibrean Jul 29 '15 at 17:21
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It is NOT a Mac OSX vs Windows... It is a color calibrated workflow issue.

The options are.

A.

1) Send a color chart to the client. (see this post How to get close to PMS 662 or PMS 296 in CMYK?) Already embedded in a Word file.

2) Let him print this color chart on the specific printer they will be using.

3) Pick up that sample.

4) Adjust the colors accordingly.

5) Pray they will be using this same printer the rest of the company's life.

B.

Be professional and print some thousand of letterheads on a offset print, using controlled pantone colors, and give that stock to your client.

C.

Do nothing and let the client know that the color sometimes will be good and sometimes will not.

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