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I'm looking to find more of creative control and create cover art for my projects. I have always been fascinated with 3D design and it's relevance in these rapid tech times. I'm attracted to the futuristic grey human bodies, grids, and weird texture aesthetics.. I assumed the software I needed would be diffrent compared to those who make their images turn to life like video games.

Wondering what software I should learn to master? What tutorials are best for me? Any sort of relevant material please push it my way.

closed as too broad by Zach Saucier, Scott, joojaa, Wrzlprmft, Hanna Aug 31 '15 at 19:19

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    Sorry, this question is too broad for our site. If you can edit it to make it more specific that'd be great! – Zach Saucier Aug 30 '15 at 3:18
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You might be surprised, but the same tools used for video game development could work for you, depending on what you're looking to do. The heavy hitters are Maya and 3DS Max. Both are from Autodesk with free trials available. There are an endless supply of free tutorial series available on YouTube to help get you started.

If you're looking for something a little less robust, Sketchup is a really good easy-to-learn resource for simple 3D shape building. A lot of concept artists I work with will use it to help with composition of 3D space in their scenes. You can set up your scene really quickly, save it out as an image, and and then paint over it in Photoshop (or however it might best fit into your personal process). It's free to use.

  • Thanks for your answer Vicki! Looking for open source so google sketch up might just be it. On this forum I've read about Blender. Which should I dive into? – kensho Aug 30 '15 at 4:07
  • Blender is another good option, it's going to be more on par with 3DS Max or Maya than something simple like Sketchup, but free so that's great if that's the type of thing you're looking for. These types of programs do have a pretty steep learning curve, so I'd watch a few tutorials online and see if the level of difficulty seems reasonable for your projects. It really just depends on what you're trying to do. – Vicki Aug 30 '15 at 5:45

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