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How do I get realistic distance representation using GIMP?

Thanks for looking into my post. I am using GIMP 2.8. I am not an expert.

I have two raw images (image1 & image 2). I have same object(item) in image 1 & image 2, but the object was displaced between images. I used GIMP to overlay both the images to figure out the displaced distance. Here is what I did.

  • I created the 1st image from clipboard, I open a new layer and placed the 2nd object.
  • I adjusted the opacity to provide transparency between image 1 & image 2.
  • I find image 2 is layered on top of image 1, but the displaced distance is not representing realistically on layered image.
  • I tried with zoom. Images look odd.

I uploaded the images in photobucket. Here are the links.

Overlayered Image

Raw Image 1

** It is not allowing to post the 3rd link. You can review via photobucket using left arrow/right arroe

If you review my separate images (base images), I am working with. Both are not on same zoom level. I mean that image 2 is a distant view with displacement.

What is the beast way to overlay these two images by preserving displacement?

Thanks for helping.

Update 9/7/2015.

Thanks for reviewing my post.

"The best method is to use a common element in both images, line that element up in the various photos and the other objects in the photo are in the proper relative position then."

These are scanned image with different zoom level.

How do I use a common element in both images, line that element up? Do you mind, sharing the GIMP steps to do that?

My car length is 15.7 feet. How do you see the displaced distance between images as correct representation?

Update 9/7/2015 3:27 PM

I did the same in GIMP (I'm not a GIMP user... but in Photoshop you place both images in the same document, on different layers.... Reduce the opacity of the top layer so you can see the underlying layer as well:)

I am getting a different view in GIMP, but your Photoshop clearly shows the car displacement ( Your 1st image). I am not sure, how to get that view (Your 1st Image) in GIMP?

  • Thanks for reviewing my post. "The best method is to use a common element in both images, line that element up in the various photos and the other objects in the photo are in the proper relative position then." These are scanned image with different zoom level. How do I use a common element in both images, line that element up? Do you mind, sharing the GIMP steps to do that? My car length is 15.7 feet. How do you see the displaced distance between images as correct representation? – user2647763 Sep 7 '15 at 17:37
  • The user removed the links and the problem can not be analized anymore. – Rafael May 5 '16 at 0:59
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The best method is to use a common element in both images, line that element up in the various photos and the other objects in the photo are in the proper relative position then.

In your image.. the sign. Simply ensure the sign in both images is the same size and in the same position and the vehicles will be in the proper position as well. From what I see the distance is represented correctly in your combination image.

I'm not a GIMP user... but in Photoshop you place both images in the same document, on different layers.... Reduce the opacity of the top layer so you can see the underlying layer as well:

enter image description here

You then position, scale, rotate, or whatever to the top layer so that the common element overlaps in both layers and appears to be one element. In this case that arrow signpost.

enter image description here

It is important to note that the "zoom levels" in your images are not different. The only difference is the position of the vehicle. And as I posted previously, your third image appears to correctly show the difference in real relation. It may not be totally clear here because really you don't need to alter either image because the zoom level and camera position are identical in both images. So you really only need to overlay them. In other images, more transformations may be required.

If, you are seeking to position one of the vehicles so it is in a different location than when the photograph was taken, that's an entirely different matter. In addition, given the quality of the photos, not a simple thing.

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