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I created the attached images in Illustrator.

On the first one (world map) I want to represent data going from one place to the other.

I had a path that I altered with the width tool, so one end is wide, and the other end ends in a small point. I duplicated this path and I used 'type on path' and in the 'type on path options', I aligned the text to the centre of the path. I had to adjust the text size character by character to fit into the orange 'beams' and I am wondering, is there a way to somehow automatically change text size, so it evenly follows how the beam is getting wider?

I also attached an image where spiraling letters are going from small to big, where I had the same problem.

enter image description hereenter image description here

Is there a way to evenly change size of text?

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    Maybe outline the text (text > create outlines) so the text becomes an object. Then you can manipulate it like any other object (like you did with the orange paths in the first pic) – PieBie Nov 12 '15 at 16:23
  • Hi Daniel, welcome to GDSE and thanks for your question. If you want to know more about the site, please see the help center or ping one of us in the Graphic Design Chat once your reputation is sufficient (20). Keep contributing and enjoy the site! – Vincent Nov 12 '15 at 17:53
  • Well, In my opinion both images look really good. – Rafael Dec 19 '15 at 17:55
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Here are two simpler methods to achieve this effect:

  1. For simple and not too curly path, you can use top object as a wrap: First you draw out the shape then you place the shape on top of the text. Next select Object>Envelope Distort>Make with Top Object

  2. For curly path, you can use Art Brush: First you create outline from the text then you drag it to Brushes panel and create Art Brush. In the Art Brush options window, you will find Brush Scale Options, select Scale Proportionately for better legibility. Now if you have a pen tablet you should be able to control the brush width by pen pressure. If not then you can use the Width tool to adjust and fine tune the brush width.

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