2

I'm trying to create an image with text that has one font on the left side, and another on right, but instead of just changing the font in the middle of the text, I want it to morph smoothly. My question is, if it is possible to do so, without manual changing every letter to look properly, using tools such as Inkscape, Adobe AE or other similar tools?

(For example: text "Hello World" has the letter "h" in "hello" written using Arial Black, while "d" in "World" is written with Trajan Pro, while every letter in between has properties of both fonts, such that on the right it looks like deformed Arial etc., to the left where text is written using deformed Trajan)

  • 2
    It is possible to do its just a lot of work. See something like This – joojaa Dec 30 '15 at 16:37
  • 1
    There are some cases where you actually have to do some work. ;) THIS is one of those times. At the end of the day this is an illustration of sorts. Everybody wants a quick fix but you need to roll up your sleeves and get to work. Good luck. Would love to see the completed piece. – ErickP Dec 30 '15 at 16:45
  • 1
    Most vector tools let you morph two shapes into one, but it rarely works the way you want it to, and, ultimately, you have to do this by hand to get what you want. This is actually a common student exercise in typography classes. – DA01 Dec 30 '15 at 21:30
  • In Illustrator: Make vertically 10 copies of the text. Set the top to Arial and the bottom to Trajan. Blend from top to bottom, then pick one successive letter from each line. ...You are aware Trajan is an all-caps font, right? It may not really look like you are envisioning it. – usr2564301 Dec 30 '15 at 23:26
  • Had the same idea using Inkscape's Extensions > Generate from path > Interpolate (convert text to paths and ungroup before interpolatin), but the interpolation does not work very well for letters. – Socowi Jan 7 '17 at 14:14
1

One way to get started is to use Illustrator's blend function.

You'll need to type the words out in both fonts, outline the text, ungroup both of them, make blends between the same letter, then set the blend options down a bit so they're not running into each other. Then you can take the intermediate letters as needed.

All of this blend stuff is in the 'object' menu. You'll need to expand the blend to get at the individual letters.

I actually tried this. A lot of the letters - particularly L and R - need work, but not a bad place to start.

Helvitica2Trajan

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.