1

Is there a simple principle or a "rule of thumb" for using tracking on serif headings on a web page (or in general)?

And most importantly what's the reasoning behind it?

For example I could gradually increate tracking (CSS letter-spacing) as headings increase. Or the other way around. Or may be don't adjust tracking at all.

Here is the example I'm working on:

enter image description here

  • 1
    In my opinion it’s not very common to adjust letterspacing (also konwn as tracking) on the web, since the distance between letters are painstakingly calculated by the font designer and even small changes can have an enormous impact on the readability of the shown text. – elegent Mar 15 '16 at 19:41
1

Is there a simple principle or a "rule of thumb" for using tracking on serif headings on a web page (or in general)?

In typography, typing a word in caps and with increased tracking was historically a way of emphasizing text, but this fell into disuse when italic fonts variants became more common since a large tracking makes a word hard to read. This applies to the web as well as anywhere else.

That being said, it kinda depends on what you want to do. Decreasing tracking can be an effective way of making your larger headings look nice and increasing it can make the smaller ones a bit more legible.

For example I could gradually increate tracking (CSS letter-spacing) as headings increase.

Or the other way around. Or may be don't adjust tracking at all.

There is no reason to change tracking in this way, except for you thinking it looks good. This is the only reason you need and it can make your design look great, but there is no general rule for it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.