5

Is it possible to offset the page grid in Scribus?

My page layout has the following settings:

Margins = 1.5 cm (top, left, right, bottom)
Page Grid = Main spacing 5.0 cm, Secondary spacing 0.5 cm.

I'd like to offset the Page Grid so that the Main spacing has its origins on the margin of the printable area (the blue line in the picture), instead of the whole page area (the red line).

Is it possible to do so? And how?

enter image description here

4

No, it's not possible.

But, in most cases, the grid is not the best way to align and distribute frames in Scribus.
(The grid is much more useful when you're doing vector graphics than in DTP.)

For layout uses, you'd better go for a typographic grid (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_%28graphic_design%29). You can create a basic one through the "Page > Manage Guides..." dialog, in the "Column / Row" tab.
You will have to play with the number of horizontal and vertical guides, with the gap (you need it!). You will also need to set the "Refer to" value to Margins.
You will probably also want to create the tyophgraphic grid on a Master page.

1

As of Scribus 1.4.5, no it is not possible.

You can "fake" it by using the bleed instead of the margin. So in your example, you'd want to set the bleeds to 1.5cm, and the margins to 0. This will offset the grid by 1.5 on all sides.

Edit: As mentioned in the comments, bleeds really aren't intended to be used this way, so this could have some unexpected consequences. If you do use this work around, you should probably change the bleeds back before exporting to PDF.

  • I have not tested if this work or not. It might give you the expected result. But, be careful: abusing the bleeds might -- under certain circumstances -- lead to unexpected behaviors in the PDF. – a.l.e Apr 8 '16 at 16:15
  • That's a good point. I've added it to the answer. – Scribblemacher Apr 8 '16 at 16:35

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