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I've been reading different articles and such and have come to the conclusion that I should send him:

-ai file

-eps file

-jpg file

-pdf file

-png file

Should I include anything else or is that sufficient?

And my other question is this: Should the jpg and png file be in CMYK or RGB and what should the resolution be, 72 dpi or 300 dpi? Thanks for the input!

EDIT: Would it be better to save the JPG and PNG as 72 dip or as 300 dpi? What do you typically do?

  • If it's only for proofing and sampling, a 72dpi jpeg or pdf would do. If it's final then send him a jpeg(incase he wants to look at the logo and he doesn't have illustrator) and the eps or ai file. – KNNKU Apr 26 '16 at 21:49
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Agree with the answer above (and CAI's comment)... I'd just add that the .ai and .eps (assuming you're referring to a vector .eps) are redundant. No need to provide both. Usually an .eps is best, as it can be opened by other vector apps (CorelDraw, etc), whereas .ai is the native Illustrator format.

Also, I usually include a black & white (grayscale) version of the .eps and .jpg... The client may not every use them, but just in case, it's better to have done the color-to-b/w conversion yourself, than have them try to do it and get bad results. It's not necessary to provide a .png file in b/w, as that's a format for web, and there's really no scenario they'd ever need to use that in a digital space.

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I would say that the file types you mentioned are fine, but as to whether to send a CMYK/RGB version, that depends on the medium the work will be displayed on. If it's print media, you will want to make sure it's CMYK for the printer to match the colors as close as possible and RGB for digital media. 300dpi is the standard for print/CMYK and 72dpi (at least) is what you're going to want for web/RGB files.

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  • You should include all of the above, always assume a logo will be used on all mediums possible. See this post. – Cai Apr 27 '16 at 19:00

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