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I am currently a graphic design major at Academy of Art University finishing up my associates degree and I would like to go into the typography field of work. I am leaning toward being a layout artist but I'm having trouble even finding the correct job title for a position such as that.

To clarify, I would like to find myself in a career that has me editing layouts (magazines, books, websites, etc.) by employing grids and having creative control over where to place type, images and other assorted content by creating typographic hierarchy.

If it helps, I've recently finished a project creating a book featuring Karl Blossfedlt's work wherein I had to use images of his work and predetermined body copy and I had the complete control over how and where to place everything to create the most aesthetically pleasing product I could.

This is what is ultimately like to do, but again, I need some help determining what type of job would have me in that position, and also, any tips or advice on how to get started on that type of career.

Thanks

  • There is no occupation that I know of that just works with layouts. Also, what does the title have to do with this question? – Zach Saucier Apr 27 '16 at 3:41
  • @ZachSaucier that occupation would be a 'Graphic Designer' ;) There are plenty of designer jobs that mostly deal with layouts. – Cai Apr 27 '16 at 8:22
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In short, you have to begin at the bottom.

What you seem to be describing there is the role of the creative director.

It is good that you trust in your own abilities, but you must prove this to your employer and focusing on one area at the beginning is not beneficial.

Your main aim should be employment in the design field, and then moving onto a specialised subject once you have a proven track record and effectively worked as an apprentice.

Think of Michael Bieruit. He was Vignelli's apprentice for the best part of a decade before even considering that he was capable enough to go ahead on his own. And that is similar of all the great designers. Even the masters of the International Typographic Style.

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