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I have the following geometric surface:

with a well-known parametric equation:

x(u,v) = u^2-v^2

y(u,v) = 2*u*v

z(u,v)= v

Now what I'm trying to do is to use the shape of this surface, only modifying the lines. Instead of the thin purple lines, I wish to use these green strips pattern:

enter image description here

Since I have no experience with graphic design, I really have no idea how to get this done by myself.

How should I approach this?

Thanks!

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  • nevermind, ive updated and added a Mathematica source pastie – joojaa May 24 '16 at 10:13
  • Hello Oswaldo, welcome to GD.SE and thanks for your question. 3D questions are a weird fit on this site. They aren't off-topic, but we have very little experts here who are able to give good answers. I'd advice you to check out the Area 51 proposal for a 3D Grpahics Stack and back them. Thanks! If you have any questions about GD.SE, have a look at the help center. – Vincent May 24 '16 at 10:43
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Your surface already has a 2D parametrisation, also known as a uv map. So all you really need to do is drop the function into any 3D app out there assign the texture on the surface and render.

For practical purposes it may be good to use something like Mathematica see this manual entry (last basic entry is the same case just different parametric surface). But i do not see a big problem doing this in most of the 3d apps I have used (Maya, 3DS Max, blender, Modo Creo, solidworks etc, though not sculping apps like mudbox).

enter image description here

Image 1: Mathematica rendering multi sampled (source)

This is also relatively easy to program yourself with say webGL, good starter project into 3D graphics. A simple shader call on a planar mesh.

But how to use a 3D app is not really in scope of graphic design (Design is not the same thing as how a app is used). Besides you do not even mention what app you are intending to use.

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