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I need to export a layer from a PSD file into a PNG but I don't know how to do it correctly because if I hide the background layer it looks totally different:

With background: With background

Without background: Without background

How do I get rid of the black stuff on the second image?

  • Are you using any blending modes on this layer? – Ryanthehouse Sep 24 '16 at 12:17
  • Also, what are you using the export for? Is it going into another PS project? Or is is being used as a stand alone image? – Ryanthehouse Sep 24 '16 at 12:18
  • @Ryanthehouse It's going to be used inside a mobile app as a standalone image. This PSD file was created by someone else and I need to grab some parts from it that will be put together inside the app (I'm not a heavy Photoshop user myself). – iosdude Sep 24 '16 at 12:24
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The black stuff you are talking about is part of the gradient. You can't really remove it entirely. There are 2 ways to reduce the effect, however.

Set the image on a background and use a blending method/filter, as you would in PS. For this you will have to research techniques for your given development language.

Reduce the "spread" of the black in the image by further reducing the size of the mask and feather it a bit.

Use a selection tool to make a selection.

Choose Select > Modify > Expand or Contract.

For Expand By or Contract By, enter a pixel value between 1 and 100, and click OK.

The border is increased or decreased by the specified number of pixels.

Check out this tutorial on feathering a selection for details.

Additionally:

As mentioned by @ErickP, "when creating a gradient that goes from one color to transparent, make sure the transparent color is "white" (or the same solid color)...you usually don't notice when it's on a background but very noticeable once the background is taken away"

  • I'd also like to add that when creating a gradient that goes from one color to transparent, make sure the transparent color is "white" (or the same solid color). Sounds odd but the "transparent" portion is still what ever color that is assigned and by default it's usually "black". Hence getting that dark color throughout the gradient. Of-course, you are getting a file that was already created but perhaps it helps to understand a bit. By the way, you usually don't notice when it's on a background but very noticeable once the background is taken away. – ErickP Sep 24 '16 at 13:55
  • Thank you @ErickP, you are correct and this is definitely helpful as well. I've update the answer accordingly. – Ryanthehouse Sep 24 '16 at 14:22

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