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I was wondering if you could help me...

I'm looking for a FONT that looks pretty much exactly like TIMES NEW ROMAN but is thicker.

I have a number of card like graphics I need to make for work. These "cards" are smallish with around 360x180 pixels of space reserved for text. Due to these cards needing to match a legacy design from well before I joined, I need to match as closely as possible the font which they originally used. No, no one here now knows what it was.

The problem I'm having is that while Times New Roman font looks really close, all the text is slightly to thin, so when the image is saved out the text is a little hard to read. This is because of the think lines used in TMR. The text also sometimes requires Bold and Bold Italic btw, so no.. it is not TMR just in bold.

TL;DR

What I am looking for is a font that is similar to Times New Roman but is generally thicker across the board.

If you have any suggestions, please let me know!

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    Can you post an image of the font you are trying to match? It's possible that someone on this site will know what it is (or at the very least, it'll be easier to match) – Scribblemacher Oct 7 '16 at 9:26
  • If all else fails and you can't find an exact match, and you're sure all the characters in TNR match your target characters. Then, you can add a stroke or outline to the font to thicken it up, but don't go over board. – nocturns2 Jan 5 '17 at 18:21
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You could use either Georgia Bold or Rufina Bold. I particularly like Rufina. It's elegant and a bit different from the usual fonts you can find in your system. Also Rufina is a google font so you won't have problems with using it online.Rufina

Georgia

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Times New Roman has more font weights than the preinstalled regular and bold on Windows. Times New Roman

Have a look at myfonts.com. You can also scan the original text and use a tool like WhatTheFont to identify the font.

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What about using Crimson Text? It has Semi-bold and Semi-bold italic styles with a similar appearance to Times New Roman.

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Difficult to be sure without an image reference, but it could just be times with a stroke. This is pretty standard practice if a typeface is just slightly too skinny. Try adding a thin stroke to the text in the same colour as the fill and then tweak the stroke width until you get a visual match.

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