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enter image description here

I'm doing pixel art with grid tool, but when i save with pdf, i still see the grid. How i delete the grid?

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It's not "the grid" - it is anti-aliasing between shapes - anti-aliasing is showing a pixel/half-a-pixel of the blue background.

If saving for web, use Art-Optimized anti-aliasing in the Save for Web dialog window.

In many cases, simply adding a solid, single fill behind all the artwork will force AI to anti-alias to a correct color. In this case, I'd place a yellow fill behind the triangle shape to force AI to anti-alias to yellow rather than blue.

(Just a common issue with AI anti-aliasing -- nothing you're causing or doing wrong.)

  • And the flaw has a nifty scientific name its called a "conflation artefact", because it conflates coverage with alpha, which is something you should never do (as in yes its a bug). Note that this may be going away as the GPU raserizer has less possibilities to conflate and is less prone to the problem. Offcourse now i have 3 renderers to account for and i cant specify for the tool to export gpu previews, argh. – joojaa Oct 11 '16 at 5:57
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As Scott has mentioned before me, this is the product of how Illustrator displays its anti-aliasing between shapes.

If you save your art as a pixel-based image file (JPEG, for example), you should find that the lines will disappear.

If you need the file as a PDF however, and you still see the lines when opening with a PDF reader, then there's only one way I can advise you to get rid of the lines.

  • Select one of the squares
  • Use the select similar command (you can find it in the top bar as this icon enter image description here, or if you can't see it, you can also go to the top menu: Select > Same > Fill Color)
  • From the pathfinder menu, select unite enter image description here

This will combine all the squares of the color you selected into one shape, and so most of the annoying lines will disappear.

Repeat the same process with the rest of the colors, and you should have a nice clean shape.

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