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So I am studying blender in my school as alternative subject for about 10 months and some of classmates recommended me this application (MAYA). Should I switch ? Kindly consider my specs Here. Thanks !

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    Depends what your goal is. Either way it would probably be better to stick with blender for now, if you're being taught that application at school. – Joonas Oct 15 '16 at 14:15
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what's difference between Maya and Blender?

Hum. Depends... With both of them you can do awesome stuff or lame projects.

As with a lot of applications one defining thing on which application you need to use is the context of where you are doing it. If your work environment requires one application or the other.

If you are a freelancer and you want to go that way, Blender is a great choice, it is free, and will remain free, so you can do projects and collaborate with a lot of freelancers. It is quite powerful, and very, very light on the basic specs needed.

If you plan to work as an employee on a company that uses Maya (or you want to be a studio that interacts with other studios that does) you could use it, but the licence is not cheap. But you can have a 3 year free licence as a student. http://www.autodesk.mx/education/free-software/maya So go and test it. The specs needed are higher.

Maya is used more often by large studios, but a lot of professional projects are done too in Blender.

So it is an opinion based choice.

Should I switch?

No idea. Download it and find out.


If you wanted a technical comparison... you probably will not find it.

There are several modelling methods, different interfaces and ways to do things.

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Look at some projects on internet. As long as you can have a great portefolio with Blender you can get a job with it. Blender its free, you can use it in any computer. That is a awsome advantage with Blender. Thats very litle that Maya can do that Blender can do but look at the cost of Maya software.

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It depends on what your goals are. If your goal is to become an application operator then your question makes some sense. If your aim is to reach deeper understanding of what you can do with either application you learn both.

There is nothing wrong with either approach. The world needs people who can just do 3d without any deeper knowledge; plain operators. The major problem with this approach is that technology comes and goes, so at some point, you become obsolete. Many 3d operators are strictly limited to one application, as doing the effort to move to another application is not paying the bills if your not intrinsically motivated to do so.

You can not really achieve deeper learning by just learning one application. You get into thinking that this one way is somehow fundamental, and there is no way to check your assumptions. Learning a second application lets you reflect on the workflow and look at all elements separated from such concerns. It is however mentally much more challenging. And this approach is not any better in terms of long term employability, as lot of employers think you're an operator anyway.

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