1

I've created a vector logo in Illustrator and pasted it into Photoshop as a Smart Object with the intention of creating some images with the logo. In Illustrator all of my paths and shapes are bang on in terms of lining up with one another which I've double checked by viewing the outlines. There are no strokes or shadows present on the artwork. When pasted into Photoshop there are tiny 1px borders in some areas which are viewable even at 100% (to a keen eye).

Is there any way to avoid this? The most noticeable bit is the arrow which is a line connected to a shape. The same effect happens if I paste the artwork in as pixels too.

Illustrator zoomed in

Photoshop zoomed in

1

The most noticeable bit is the arrow which is a line connected to a shape. The same effect happens if I paste the artwork in as pixels too.

It looks like these are considered two separate objects in Illustrator. Go to Window -> Pathfinder in Illustrator and select the 'Unite' button to combine them into one complete shape.

enter image description here

If you are exporting the Illustration as a raster graphic before you open it into Photoshop, make sure it uses a suitable resolution for the intended use.

1

The problem is aliasing. You need to select the anti-aliasing checkbox. You may need to do this at the paste stage - I don't think you can do it later.

Explanation here (this one relates to text but its the same concept): https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/key-concepts/aliasing-anti-aliasing.html

If that's not the problem then I would ask what size the object is - If it's just a few pixels in size then it would look like that anyway.

  • No it really is a bad design in the algorithm. And yes the preview renderer has better design than the software renderers. And no adobe does not allow you to save the hardware render. – joojaa Jan 9 '17 at 19:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.