0

I am designing a personalized crest and a 'photo call' background (like for movie premieres) for a wedding (mine, actually).

I've done two mock-ups/versions of the wedding crest (white and navy blue backgrounds), and I will need to incorporate these wedding crests into a checkerboard pattern design for the photocall background.

Here's a mock-up of the photo call - each square is about 10x10 inches. 9 squares tall, 15 squares across. So that's 90 inches (7 1/2 feet) tall, and 150 inches (12.5 feet) wide.

My questions are thus:

  1. The stock elements/images I'm planning on using to make the wedding crest are pretty large files in and of themselves (the floral crest, the rose, etc.). If I use those wedding crests in a repeating checkerboard pattern, wouldn't it stand to reason that the file size would get un-manageably massive? For example, each 'square' (crest, rose bud, silhouette) will be roughly 5000 px x 5000 px or 16.7″ x 16.7″. If you multiply that by 9 (# of squares tall) and by 15 (# squares across), the pixel count is immense.

  2. I am a novice graphic designer (not in the professional sense). I'm not very comfortable with Adobe Illustrator and vector images, and would prefer to use Adobe Photoshop and JPEG images instead. The JPEGs available for download are 300 DPI and large, so I'm fairly sure the quality would be high enough to print on a photocall background. Is this OK?

enter image description here

These are the 4 stock design elements (from Shutterstock) that I intend to download to make the personalized wedding crest:

(A) Floral Crest (navy blue) (Large | 5000 px x 5000 px | 16.7″ x 16.7″ @ 300 dpi)

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-vector/elegant-monogram-design-template-calligraphic-floral-310000439?src=hI21m7djRWjpvho_Gdd1sw-1-33

(B) Floral Crest (white) (Large | 5000 px x 5000 px | 16.7″ x 16.7″ @ 300 dpi)

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-vector/elegant-floral-monogram-design-template-one-309999314?src=hI21m7djRWjpvho_Gdd1sw-1-17

(C) Red Rose Bud (Large | 5000 px x 5000 px | 16.7″ x 16.7″ @ 300 dpi)

https://image.shutterstock.com/z/stock-vector-red-rose-on-white-background-vector-illustration-211341856.jpg

(D) 'Marie Antoinette' profile silhouette (Small | 763 px x 800 px | 2.5″ x 2.7″ @ 300 dpi (Vector image available as well))

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-vector/woman-profile-silhouettes-princess-vector-art-259729550?src=XIl-97uZmPBeK1WLoSLpXA-1-3

(NOTE: Each of these files have a JPEG or Vector download option.)

  • NOTE: These are the 4 stock design elements (from Shutterstock) that I intend to download to make the personalized wedding crest: (A) Floral Crest (navy blue) (Large | 5000 px x 5000 px | 16.7″ x 16.7″ @ 300 dpi) [![shutterstock.com/image-vector/… (B) Floral Crest (white) (Large | 5000 px x 5000 px | 16.7″ x 16.7″ @ 300 dpi) [![shutterstock.com/image-vector/… – user86429 Feb 14 '17 at 20:44
  • (C) Red Rose Bud (Large | 5000 px x 5000 px | 16.7″ x 16.7″ @ 300 dpi) [![image.shutterstock.com/z/… (D) 'Marie Antoinette' profile silhouette (Small | 763 px x 800 px | 2.5″ x 2.7″ @ 300 dpi (Vector image available as well)) [![shutterstock.com/image-vector/… (NOTE: Each of these files have a JPEG or Vector download option.) – user86429 Feb 14 '17 at 20:46
  • Use Vector. All of your concerns about sizes and files are due to your insistence on rasterizing. Vectors can be stored once in a file and re-instanced. Use a DTP compositing program such as indesign or scribus, place the vectors, and export a PDF to a size determined by you Printer. They will handle the rasterization. Note also that 300dpi is probably not appropriate for a large scale banner. – Yorik Feb 14 '17 at 21:08
1

I believe these are referred to as a Step & Repeat Banner more commonly than a Photo Call. Photo Call, from my understanding, refers to a set time that a photographer arranges to take pictures.

Semantics aside...

  1. I would highly recommend using Illustrator for this, as it is much better suited to handle vector/print projects like yours. If you don't want to navigate the steeper learning curve that comes with AI, PS will suffice, but you are right in that you might wind up with a massive file.

    To reduce your document size and since you are using the same instance of these images throughout, I would insert the images via the File > Place Linked option. This will keep the final size of your PSD to a minimum. Bear in mind, if you wish to transfer the said PSD to someone else for editing, you will need to also send all of your linked artwork. When you have your design finalized and are ready to print, save it as a PDF and the images will be embedded automatically, so you won't need to include them with the PDF when sending to print.

  2. 300 DPI is the standard for printing, so the source images are fine.

In my opinion, this is a very simple project and I wouldn't imagine you struggling too much with AI. Instead of the File > Place Linked command used in PS, you would use File > Place in AI. You then want to click Options at the bottom of that window and ensure you select "Link".

enter image description here

Same rules about including artwork apply, when transferring your working document to someone.

  • Manly, thanks for your helpful advice, I really appreciate it. I will take a stab at creating it in Illustrator. Can you tell me if I can download the four (4) hi-res JPEG files from Shutterstock (above), and use those to work in Illustrator? (Sorry if that question sounds silly or even idiotic somehow, but we all have to start somewhere.) Or - if I can't work with JPEGs to create this artwork for the 'Step & Repeat Banner' (thanks for the correct terminology!) - I'll have to download the Vector image option from Shutterstock and work with those. Thank you again, Manly! – user86429 Feb 14 '17 at 23:27
  • 1
    @user86429 The vectors will keep your file size smaller. I suggest you create symbols from your vectors. Then you can place those symbols throughout your document. JPGs will work, but then you need to deal with the hassle of linking images or suffering a large file size, if they're embedded. – Manly Feb 15 '17 at 16:47
  • 1
    Don't. Use. JPEG. – Yorik Feb 15 '17 at 17:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.