3

I have seen quite a lot of illustrations on Dribble which have thick strokes. For example this one.

Octopus

I have a general idea, and can go about making some of my own designs like this.

My Try at Illustrations with Thick Strokes[3]

But I don't think that the way that I am approaching this design is correct. If someone could help me understand the proper technique to approach it would be very helpful. A tutorial or even speed art helps.

5

I call that style dribbble-esqqque. It has no particular name. Just happens to be a trendy style. Words you could use to describe it, though:

  • iconography
  • fixed-width line art
  • flat color
  • flat shading

Your style is certainly a valid style, but the primary differences:

  • you used multiple stroke widths (instead of one width)
  • you use a lot more detail
  • you aren't using any shading for depth effect
3

Comparing your image and the original, a few differences are very clear:

  • Use a thick stroke for large details, all the same thickness;
  • shadow and light are done with solid color blocks;
  • smaller details are done with color blocks as well;
  • all stroke caps are round.

You should get a good grasp of light and shadow technique to give it proper volume, and for creating the vector shapes itself there are plenty of illustration tutorials around the web.

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