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I'm using Scribus for some print design projects and I'm trying to find out how to use Pantone spot colors. The wiki here has a list of steps to follow but I was confused on #3 when is says to "assign the correct Pantone color names." Does that mean under Colors>Edit I name my colors the Pantone Color code as well as checking the box for 'spot color'? If so is there a specific format to be used like "Pantone 100" or "Pantone100" etc. ?

Thank you!!

  • Are you building a file that will be printed as spot colours or are you wanting to use Pantone libraries as a source for colours that will ultimately be printed out of process colours? – Westside May 30 '17 at 15:28
  • Yeah, I'm creating a document and have in mind the pantone colors I want to be printed as spot colors – markagrios May 30 '17 at 15:30
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Yes.

At least if I got you correctly.

For Spot colors (and Pantone colors are the most common type of spot colors) it's the name of the color that matters.

You will probably pick a value, too... but that value will only be used for the preview on screen (and also on "non offset" printers) and will be ignored when printing with spot colors.
(Of course, for your sanity, you will want to match as well as possible the rendering of the color with the color that will be printed... but it's not a requirement.)

  • Thanks! So if I want to use PANTONE 15-0343 for example, when I name my colors in the color editing menu, what should I name it after I check the box for spot color? – markagrios May 30 '17 at 15:40
  • You should name it "PANTONE 15-0343" and check the box for spot color. (And then pick a dull green for the preview) – a.l.e May 30 '17 at 15:46
  • I've not tested it, but if you plan to work with Pantone colors in the future, you can have a look at SwatchBooker or the script the same author has written for Scribus: selapa.net/scribus . – a.l.e May 30 '17 at 15:49

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