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I have a question about an InDesign document setup/ export.

I have a task to create an outdoor event poster at these specs.

'Actual size is 2175mm deep x 3230mm wide type area 2095mm deep x 3150mm wide. Add 50mm bleed all round. Set to 10% at 400dpi'

I have not created such a large poster before so I'm a bit confused with 'Set to 10% at 400dpi' I'm not sure what it means from an InDesign point of view.

Is the 10% just the view in the program or an actual setup of the document? if so I'm not how that effects the export file... or does the 10% thing, somehow in the PDF export settings.

Also the 400 dpi. is that also a PDF export settings? I know InDesign is a layout program. All the art is imported vector image from Illustrator. so its all vector and no restored images in the InDesign project. Normally imported images set the resolution.

There is no time to do a test print so I'm want to make sure I'm sending the exported PDF.

(soz, no screenshot, keeps giving me an error)

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You actually design at 10% scale so your document size is 217.5mm x 323.0mm. The safe area is smaller at 209.5mm x 315mm. Do not place text or logos outside the safe area. Make sure to add 5mm bleed when setting up the document.

When you export your document you can set the compression for images in the compression tab. But if you're only using vector artwork then it doesn't matter.

  • Good answer, couple of additional points: 10% is commonly used as a scale as it means you just have to move a decimal point over when checking sizes. Even though your artwork is vector you want to double check your raster effect settings in Illustrator if you're using drop shadows or glow effects, since those effects will be rasterized when printing. – Dre Jun 7 '17 at 12:35
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    Note: add 5 mm bleed when setting up the document, not 50 mm. Otherwise you'll end up with 500 mm (50 cm) bleed when you scale it up for printing. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jun 7 '17 at 23:39
  • Also make sure the effective PPI of your images is at least 400 at the size you are using them in your document. – ispaany Jun 8 '17 at 13:44

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