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Any duotone experts out there? What would be your main tips to create duotones?

Other than using a light and a dark color and mapping them to light and shadows. I'm interested especially in print outputs and not just on screen results.

I either use the duotone mode and curves, or use the channels to create a DCS if I need to make something from scratch. Are there other approaches?

marked as duplicate by Emilie, Community Sep 25 '17 at 19:23

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  • Your question is interesting but a bit broad. Is it for digital print? Is it for offset-printing spot colors? And what do you want to achieve? To reproduce a full-color image with just two inks? To color a grayscale image with crazy colors? To reproduce a grayscale image with black and gray to get more contrast and details? To make an image match a physical product? Anyway, you can read some thoughts on different way to create "true" duotone images (only using two inks) here: graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/a/84485/84899. – Wolff Sep 25 '17 at 18:39
  • @Wolff Yes I agree it's broad, I was actually looking for a canonical about duotone making here and your answer didn't come up in my search. Thank you for pointing it out. I'll close my own question now ;-) – Emilie Sep 25 '17 at 19:22
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Are you planning to do a photo based design/image output or a duo tone vectored image?

If a photo based duo tone mapping, this sites would get your juices up.

http://www.designbynumbers.io/create-gorgeous-duotones-in-three-easy-steps/ https://24slides.com/blog/graphic-design-trend-duotone/

If trying out vectors, what I usually do is play around with outlines using black and tones with white/gray.

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