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I am wondering, whether there is a template vendor who sells templates with unique fonts, not only those overused and notoriously known like Helvetica, Open Sans, or any other of the free Google fonts etc.

UPDATE: I am asking because – If you are looking for a new identity, you might consider for a higher standard template, which includes special font. You need to distinguish your brand but have not chance to build a new web, business cards, resume, portfolio whatever.

On the other side, there are plenty independent type foundries producing high-quality and unique fonts. (ie.: Grilli, Rosetta, Urtd, etc) Therefore I got this idea, that there can be already some template producers, who want to push template standards higher and sell templates with the special font licence included.

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    What template have you used that came with a licensed font? When you download a template, you're paying for the code, not the font. I haven't seen a template that also has a font license, that is why people use open source fonts from Google for templates. – AndrewH Oct 5 '17 at 14:35
  • I have clarified the question. – Filip Zajac Oct 6 '17 at 18:55
  • Any template vendor that would take the time to get custom fonts created would find that it'd make more sense to just sell custom fonts rather than bundling them as part of a template. – DA01 Oct 6 '17 at 19:26
  • I haven't said that template vendor must develop fonts, just to have a contract with independent type foundry. Anyway, the question is whether something like that exists. – Filip Zajac Oct 7 '17 at 9:38
  • The problem is that font foundries want their cut. that means that the template is your cost + foundry license cost + marketplace cost. That means that in the low end you end up upmarking your template by 40-80 dollars. Now then this cost makes it harder for you to sell the template, and at about 200-300$ you hit the custom designed template cost so not much space to live in – joojaa Oct 7 '17 at 16:26
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There are a couple of issues you are facing here--one is that fonts used in templates have to be available to the end user, so they must use a font that can be downloaded for free and the source of that downloadable font has to be reputable enough that the designer believes that the font will still be available in the future.

Another issue is that fonts like Helvetica and Open Sans are used often because they work well in many situations. You may consider them overused, but I might consider them perfect because they evoke a feeling that my company has been around for a while.

And of course, you have given us no idea about what type of templates you are looking for. Are you looking for a resume template for a young graphic designer, a template for corporate letterhead, a template for a concert poster? Each of these templates are going to use completely different fonts.

Are you purchasing templates, or using free templates? That might make a difference-someone who wants to sell their template might use a more unusual font to help attract more purchasers. Personally, I don't think I have ever purchased a template (not that I have purchased many) that used a font that I didn't have to download because it was not a standard font.

And then, maybe this is obvious, but you are purchasing a template--if you don't like the font, find another one and use that instead.

Okay, with all of that said, I would try looking for templates on sites that are more focused on art and design--the two that come to mind off the top of my head are Behance and Deviant Art. It is not as easy to find templates on these sites, but they are there, and it is more likely that the designs posted on these sites will be artistic or graphically interesting than those on a template site that aims to appeal to non-graphically-inclined corporate users.

  • I am asking: 1. whether exist some template vendor – no matter what kind of visual template. 2. no matter of licencing. 3. no matter template purpose, industry look, or look and feel. – Filip Zajac Oct 6 '17 at 18:50
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They do not really sell templates with custom fonts because fonts are generally licensed separately.

If you are concerned about the metrics when you change fonts you can do the following.

You can look up what fonts have the same metrics as the font in your template.

For example Helvetica has pretty much the exact kerning as Arial.

In fact licensing fonts for a layout and having everything fit right is such a mess that it is the reason Arial was created in the first place.

It was created to be metrically identical to the popular typeface Helvetica, with all character widths identical, so that a document designed in Helvetica could be displayed and printed correctly without having to pay for a Helvetica license.

So, you are going to have to do the work of licensing the Web Fonts, making sure it fits in the template correctly, etc... all by yourself.

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