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I am trying to find the typeface used in this edition of La Maison Tellier by Guy de Maupassant published in Paris in 1929 by Louis Conard:

Typical page

Title page

(I tried an automated tool, but it didn't work.)

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  • Take a better photo, or scan the document at a higher resolution, then automated font identifiers might work. – Billy Kerr Oct 8 '17 at 11:19
  • You indicated you used 'an' automated tool; could you tell us which one? Please have a look at our requirements for font-identification questions and try and edit your question to follow those. Thanks! – Vincent Oct 10 '17 at 14:24
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The font appears to be Romain Text/Romain Headline.

It can be purchased from Swiss Typefaces

enter image description here

Image showing the Rs matching as called out by Phillip

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  • It looks similar, but not exactly the same: look at the lower right end of the capital R. It extends more in the font you suggest than in the original post – Philipp Oct 9 '17 at 20:44
  • I don't think you're correct. If you line them up it's a near perfect match. Even with the scans not being flat. See my updated answer. – Ovaryraptor Oct 10 '17 at 14:12
  • You may be right. I didn’t want to force you into extra work. +1 – Philipp Oct 10 '17 at 15:09
  • No worries, just ensuring accuracy! – Ovaryraptor Oct 10 '17 at 16:26
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The only resemblant I saw is SangBleu Serif. It's a little too thin, but there's no SangBleu Serif Reqular available.

enter image description here

It's sold by Swiss Typefaces. It has been available since 2008, so it probably is an engineered version of that old book font.

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The answer is (I think): Romain du Roi, or Grandjean Corps 20. I looked it up in the following reference: An Introduction to the History of Printing Types, by Geoffrey Dowding, 1961. See page 78, for an illustration of Grandjean Corps 20, which seems to be an exact match.

enter image description here

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  • No, it's close, but not exact. Look at the bottom of the 'c'. – John O Oct 10 '17 at 0:08
  • It's embarrasing to accept my own answer. But it's the best match. The problem with the 'c' might be an error in the reproduction of the text, because the 'c' s don't all match 100%. – John O Oct 21 '17 at 21:48
  • No reason to shame. None of us bothered to check historical sources. – user287001 Oct 21 '17 at 22:43
  • Yes, this is it (probably a recut copy). The key signs are the symmetrical serifs on the 'b', 'd' and other characters and the lower-case 'L' with a notch, based on calligraphy of the period. – Copilot Jan 8 '18 at 2:07

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