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22

Use a grid system. Draw the circular shadow on a flat non-distorted grid. Draw the distorted grid, and use the flat grid as a guide, noting where the shadow intersects with the grid lines. For example:


21

To amplify Billy Kerr's excellent response, if you wanted to set your light source in your illustration other than directly overhead (I can see Billy took, as I do, your initial sketched dashed lines running vertically as your intended shadow edge) you would draw vanishing points from the light source past the edges of your sphere to show the shadow path, ...


21

Use a real 3D program. Your best option is probably Blender. It is great, and I mean great 3D program, for modeling and rendering (besides a tonne of other things); and that is what you need. This image was done in 5 minutes. You probably need to look for some tutorials to move around. https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Blender+simple+text But ...


19

Follow this simple steps: Select the layer and press Ctrl+T and Right click on the transform and choose Perspective and then Hold Ctrl and drag the right side corner towards down


18

There is more than one single way to accomplish this. However, by far the simplest way is to utilize the Symbols Library. Create a Single Arrow Open up the Symbols palette: Window > Symbol (Shift + Ctl/Cmd + F11) From the Symbols palette menu, choose Open Symbol Library > Arrows Next, choose the appropriate arrow from the Arrows palette to add to your ...


15

The easiest way is probably to use a 2D greyscale image as a depth map to extrude a 3D object. 3D programs will give you more control but you can do this in Photoshop (see Create 3D objects from 2D images in Photoshop - Adobe Support). This for example, took me a few minutes in Photoshop: Using this as a depth map: Chae Byung-rok does have a few other ...


14

You can not achieve that appearance in Illustrator using effects. Illustrator's 3D Extrude is pretty rudimentary and will never allow a flat front face with an extrusion. In order for any extrusion to show, using Illustrator's 3D effect, you must rotate the object. That's not what you have in your image. What you can do to achieve this appearance in ...


14

This is pretty easy in cycles, by mixing a transparent node with an emission shader based on how close the camera is to facing the normals head on. You can get the "facing" value with a Layer wieght node or by taking the dot product of the normal and the incoming rays from the camera: These methods are pretty much equivalent, though you have a handy ...


13

Ok, so I figured out one way to do this effect. I started with the original photo in Photoshop (I used the Wikimedia photo of Alan Turing) I then adjusted the contrast and levels to make the photo more dramatic for the halftoning effect later: I added a Gaussian blur (about 5 pixels) to the photo and saved it to be placed into illustrator. Remember fo ...


13

Generating 3D objects in illustrator is all about illusion. In your case you are trying to create a 3D object with 1 shape. However sometimes it's best to create the illusion of 1 shape or object by using two or more. For example the object below I created is two shapes, one on top of the other. Here's how it breaks down visually. And here is the step by ...


12

As it may be possible in theory to draw an anaglyph stereoscopic image by hand this process is rather complicated. Binocular disparity is Maths and Geometry Our brain will compute the third dimension from the two independent flat 2D projections of our world to the retina of our eyes. Both the right eye and the left eye will see the objects from a different ...


11

Alternatively to Bala's answer, If you're mocking your image on to something like a monitor for this example, I find it easier to use the Distort tool as you can drag the corners of the image to match what ever it is you're laying your image onto. Edit → Transform → Distort Drag the corner points to the edges of the monitor to fill the blank screen Add a ...


11

In order to achieve the effect you're looking for, you need to apply your texture in such a way that affects the displacement 3D structure of your base model, or at the very least gives the appearance of displacement. In 3DS Max, you either want to use your texture as a bump map or displacement map for your model. I will explain what each of these techniques ...


11

I cannot offer any information on how to do this yourself, but it was revealed in one of the production videos for The Hobbit that artists Alan Lee and John Howe produced some hand-drawn red/cyan 3D concept art. We thought we'd try and come up with some way of actually incorporating a 3D aspect into the way that we were producing the concept art that ...


11

You can not do that on your image as you have it. 1) You want a cylindrical projection on a sphere. First your canvas needs to be at one exact proportion. 3.1416:1 (Use any pixel sized canvas you want, for example 3141x1000px) 2) And you (normally) need the horizon to be at the center of the canvas. On a cylindrical projection (from a sphere) you have a ...


11

Odds are very high this was produced in a 3D DCC* (**Digital Content Creation) program like Modo, Maya, 3DS, Cinema 4D, Blender, Houdini or Lightwave - I say this because you can clearly see some subtle details like incident light bouncing, most commonly called Global Illumination (GI), AO (Ambient Occlusion), and even a hint of SSS (Sub-Surface-Scatter) ...


10

You can do this in Photoshop CS 5 (Extended) but somewhat painfully. However, if you have Photoshop CS 6 Extended it is now even easier to do this with Photoshop's updated 3D tools and user experience. Additionally, as it is in true 3D space all of the perspective is controlled by a virtual camera, which you can adjust like Field of View and Depth of Field. ...


10

You can create a circle and a second one in the middle (the inner circle should be the size of the stacked ones) Then draw a line down the middle and use Shape Builder Tool to separate them: Rotate the (yellow) piece to desired angle and then apply the same 3D angles - just make the Extrusion Depth much higher:


9

Two relevant terms: The type of flat-3D perspective is isometric view (or more accurately pseudo-isometric because it looks like it's not strictly based on 120 degrees). The style of limited-detail but accurate drawing is like instructional diagrams - in particular, it looks based on styles commonly used in in-flight safety diagrams. A lot of the incidental ...


9

You could also do it like this. So I have bunch of layers that form the grid of images. To give it flexibility, I put them into a Smart Object Then from the top menu Edit > Free Transform ( ...or Windows: Ctrl+T Mac: Cmd+T ) In the Free Transform toolbar at the top, click Warp modes icon On the left side, from the warp dropdown, select Bulge. Add ...


9

Diamonds are fragmented as prisms. If you want it to appear more 3D you need to find a way to make it appear fragmented. This could be with lines such as: Or through gradients and shading like this: Yours looks flat because it is. The entire front is just one piece. You need to add lines and/or shading to create depth to it showing where different ...


8

I've created an Adobe® Illustrator® Plug-in called Oblique Projection 'opo' to automate the creation process of Parallel 3D Effect (Extrude Effect). It is quick and gives you full control over the appearance of the extrusion. Everything is on one layer so you can easily separate it from the rest of the artwork. Plus it is divided into logical parts - this ...


8

I don't think Photoshop is the tool you should use for this. However, Illustrator has the "rotate around the z axis" function you are describing. In a nutshell, you trace the shape of half of the object: Then use Effect → 3D → Revolve... on that object Then you can map whatever are you need to make it look as photo-realistic as you like. I didn't spend ...


8

Knowing if you enjoy 3D art is something you'll just have to see for yourself. If you still like learning about it and doing it a year or two down the line, it's likely you'll keep doing it for a while. When your getting started, I would not recommend going out and buying a ton of expensive software and training material. You can learn the majority of 3D ...


8

It looks pretty trivial to draw by hand. Here's a few tricks you could use to make it a bit easier: Start by setting up a grid for your document (via File → Document Properties... → "Grids" tab) and turn on "Snap to Grid". That way, you won't have to take so much care in getting things lined up correctly. Also (or alternatively), you could set ...


8

Joonas's answer is on the money, but another method is to use Distort > Displace: The input is another .psd that acts as a displacement map. The red channel controls horizontal distortion, and green controls vertical. Neutral gray means no movement, white = up/left, black = down/right. By setting a couple of gradients across the channels you can get ...


8

A masterpiece of manual crafting is already suggested by other users. I believe it. No automatic software can combine the multiple functions of the strokes, namely showing the geometric surface form, creating some outlines (rabbit's face features) and creating the shading. There are those horizontal strokes and the wanted shape as line art for a start. One ...


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