New answers tagged

1

Someone on GD.SE commented that I don't know how light and perspective works. Moreover, the product I placed here near plant is in wrong plane. In this scene, the viewer has the perception of looking slightly down onto the bench top. In other words, the horizon, if you could see it, would be high in the image. So the top face of the box, sitting well below ...


0

I'm going to say that I think it's most crucial to be thoughtful in what you use to set up your assumptions about the perspective planes in a given image: remember all parallel lines should correctly converge on a vanishing point. In my case, I also 'cheated' a little, in that for the right-hand vanishing point (for which we have the least reference data) I ...


-2

Apart from answer below you also put a box in perspective that is not playing well with chosen background. Maily due to lack of any edge on the pot and only (almost) two planes the brain is expecting a central persective While your box is forcing vanishing point to be on the left You can of course force two vanishing point in picture but you would need ...


39

There is no 3D modeler at work in your examples. If you look at your sample images, all the highlights are the same, and you can pick out coins which are identical. This is a clear indicator that there's no actual 3D taking place. Coins are drawn in a 2D application with perspective, then duplicated and altered slightly. A quick rough example.... You may ...


4

Match what's there in most instances and whenever possible. The light is stationary, therefore all object should cast the same angle shadow. The closer together objects are, the similar the shadow angle will be. Based on the plant in that photo, the primary light source is almost directly in front of the plant. If you draw lines to indicate the shadow on ...


6

Technically speaking you've already done what you set out to do, with blender. But as Scott pointed out the examples you've provided have been drawn from the start in 2D to include a third dimension, and are not actually 3D. Regarding the "realism", I'd like to point out two things in your examples that stand out to me when compared to your image: The ...


0

I’ve done a rough model to exemplify some rules about lengths deformation in orthographic projections. Perspective is similar, only with extra deformation based on distance from the camera. The simplest way to project a plane is parallel to the projection plane. You get actual lengths of the object and therefor the actual ratio between verticals and ...


3

What you see in that image can easily be achieved with a 2D app like Inkscape, but if you really need to learn 3D, try Blender or Sketchup all of which are good, free options.


0

It is simply the wrong filter. You are using blue red glasses optimized for monitor colors. You should simply use different set of glasses optimized for cyan and magenta works fine you just need a different filtering material that's all. Can you find a spot color that may work with your glasses. Sure, but its probably cheaper to change the filter to match ...


0

You can't print what you want with process CMYK inks, but if you really MUST print with CMYK then you certainly can make an image that works with the glasses. What you need to to is turn down the brightness in the image until all the colors become printable. This will make your background grey, but through the red lens it will look just like the red ink, ...


6

The pictures from your sample are not stereoscopic. You used the exact same picture for the left and right eye. You can not recreate a stereoscopic view from a single picture. Both pictures need a different perspective with preferably lines converging at the focus distance. Engineering drawings like the illustration uses isometric, so every line curve can ...


1

The other answers are right: converting from RGB to CMYK after preparing your artwork is a recipe for dull colours. While CMYK cyan is duller than RGB cyan, it shouldn’t be nearly as dull as what you’ve shown here. You should work directly in CMYK and make sure your art is only on the correct channels. Having said that, the artwork preparation will depend a ...


10

If you MUST use Cyan and you want something around RGB saturation then you need to work with paper. There are some that reacts very well to certain paints and give them extra boost. They are also usually custom ordered so much pricey than regular print. Which make sense to eaither print with Pantone (as per Wolff answer) or ask your printhouse for a custom ...


18

Sadly, these very saturated colors can't be reproduced in CMYK. You could try to make the image in CMYK mode, where you make sure that the red is CMYK(0, 100, 100, 0) and the cyan is CMYK(100, 0, 0, 0). Don't make it in RGB and convert to CMYK as it might pollute the clean inks. I believe that it's important to only use solid colors (all CMYK values 0% or ...


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