17

The development version of Inkscape (upcoming 0.91 release) has a global anti-aliasing toggle in the Document Properties window, which should also work for export. Look for "Development Versions" on the download page: http://www.inkscape.org/en/download/


16

It is called subpixel rendering, or subpixel anti aliasing. Microsoft does something similar for most windows applications. Your screen consists of colors that are next to each other. If you do a simple sample based anti aliasing you do not get the best possible result. But by leveraging of the knowledge of how the pixels are laid out you can get better ...


13

One simple solution is to export to PDF, and then use Ghostcript on the resulting PDF. Using a strawberry image from Openclipart and the command gs -dSAFER -dBATCH -dNOPAUSE -sDEVICE=png16m \ -r72 -dGraphicsAlphaBits=1 \ -sOutputFile=image.png image.pdf I get the following result. If your image also includes text, you’ll need to add -dTextAlphaBits=...


12

If you are having aliasing problems in Illustrator CC 2015, ⌘+E toggles between GPU and CPU previewing. CPU's anti-aliasing is 1000% better.


12

Adobe Illustrator constructs objects with vector mathematics. However, it has to interpret that vector data into pixels in order to display it on the (pixel-based) monitor. To create smooth lines on screen it anti-aliases pixels when two colors lie next to each other. It essentially "blends" the two colors together over a pixel or two in order to represent ...


12

Inkscape 0.91 and above has the ability to toggle antialiasing. This can be accessed through the Document Properties window (Shift+Ctrl+D). When turned on, which is the default, this image of an array of triangles looks like this. When turned off the image looks smoother. As others have mentioned, this currently has no effect on the png export. ...


11

Assuming you're scaling up by integer multiples, as per your example, this is easy enough. In the Photoshop resize dialog, just choose Resample image: Nearest Neighbor. See image for clarity:


10

Most operating systems and browsers render with antialiasing or sub-pixel antialiasing. Sub-pixel antialiasing is common on desktop platforms, like Windows (with ClearType) and OS X. Standard monochrome antialiasing is common on mobile platforms, where the device's sub-pixel order may change with device orientation, and where sub-pixel rendering isn't as ...


10

File - save for web Select your output file (jpg|png|gif) and the quality In the middle you will see a drop down under percent. Select "Type Optimized"


8

No. The new line of thought is to avoid Photoshop for layout and typography design and start in the browser as early as possible. By passing the client an actual URL as opposed to a Photoshop comp, you avoid the client's expectations being dashed when the final product renders slightly different in their browser of choice vs the Photoshop comps. Ultimately,...


7

You should be exporting directly to the pixel dimensions you need from the original Illustrator file. You'll probably do just fine altering the size in the save for web dialog rather than creating a scaled vector version for every instance.


6

This is a product of using diagonal lines on a grid (which is essentially what a PNG is: a grid of pixels). Here's a diagonal line on a grid. Each of the squares represents a pixel, greatly enlarged here. Some pixels need to be only partially coloured. It's not possible to colour a pixel like this. It needs to be all one colour. Without anti-aliasing, the ...


6

This is called subpixel rendering. The different colours are only visible because the image has been blown up. It will be easier to give an example of white on black. Imagine a one pixel thick white line. On most desktop LCD screens the individual subpixels colours are arranged horizontally. As long as all three colour pixels are turned on we will see a ...


6

To be able to rotate, deform or scale a floating selection with the corresponding tools we have to set Interpolation to None in the Tool Options to avoid anti-aliasing. Then a selection will be transformed with sharp edges but with aliasing, of course:


5

Never rely on any print provider to do anything other than spit out your file as it currently exists. I would never trust that something will be output in a specific manner to ensure it is as I expect. If you have to provide instructions or notes on how to output, then it's a recipe for error. If you place a 25ppi image in Indesign it never gets "upsampled" ...


5

Firstly, you're VERY observant ;) I'm guessing you're working on a document that is in CMYK colour mode? How you tackle it depends on your purpose. If you are creating print graphics then you can safely ignore it, because it's an artefact of how Illustrator renders the CMYK color model on screen. If you're creating graphics for screen, switch to RGB – ...


5

A possible work-around might be to use the "sharp" anti-aliasing method and set a 0-depth inner glow on the text layer: For this sample I used white color, 85% opacity, "screen" blend mode, 0 choke, 0 size. Not as good as Ms clear-type, but it looks less boldy... (first line = no anti-aliasing, last line = sharp anti-aliasing without the inner glow)


5

I found that just by changing two pixels in the middle of the second image to white, I could make it a lot more clear: Here they are at normal size: It's definitely a little better. So, you might do well just by scaling down Helvetica and then zooming in all the way to see what's making it fuzzy, and then fixing it from there. I didn't spend a lot of time, ...


5

This connects to my question from a few weeks back. I feel there is still not a great answer for "How do I determine when a webfont can cut it vs when to use graphic type?" I outlined how I make that determination, though it's still fuzzy. The bottom line is, you need to test webfonts in multiple browsers on multiple systems as early in the design process ...


5

I still haven't tested this, but I think I figured out a workaround. In troubleshooting another issue, I came to know the option "Color to Alpha", which seems exactly what's needed here. I think I can get Antialiasing like usual against one specific color and then use Color to Alpha to turn that color into different degrees of transparency. This would work ...


5

You should rasterize it in the right pixel dimensions directly from Illustrator whenever possible, but when you're resizing things in Photosohop there is a choice of resampling modes: Nearest Neighbor - This is the simplest form of resampling, if you can even call it that, where the original pixels are just expanded to the next full pixel to fill the new ...


5

Your original image ("8SLgo.png", labeled "here is the image" in your question) already has the blurring between squares and blurry text. Here it is, enlarged 5x and composed against a white background: It looks to me as though your friend created the image in a smaller size and then enlarged it to the 110x130 size before sending it to you. If the ...


5

Sometimes, it really depends on what you do. For pixel art style sprites its quite commonly done manually. But for general graphics not so much. Expecting an "anti-alias filer" This exists its usually called bicubic downsampling. See the computer can not know how to anti-alias because the signal is unknown. But if you provide a better signal it can ...


4

Unfortunately, no, there isn't a way to, using the tools that Photoshop has by default, replicate the different browsers' rendering (note that all browsers render text in a distinct way). That's one of the reasons lots of designers create mockups straight in html/css, because of these discrepancies. There are, however, Photoshop actions and plugins you can ...


4

In Edit > Preferences > General there is an option that toggles Anti-Aliasing for art as it is displayed on screen while you work. Under Effect > Document Raster Effect Settings there is a checkbox for Anti-Aliasing that controls to some degree the outcome of the file once it is saved to a non-vector format (ie. jpg, gif, png). Depending on which file type ...


4

The original file looks like a minified PNG file. Unfortunately, Adobe Photoshop cannot save images as indexed PNG files with alpha transparency, and Photoshop CS5 and below cannot even display them properly. The file itself was probably generated with tinypng or similar. You could maybe try their plugin for Photoshop and see if that will let you open that ...


3

Screenshots on Retina Macs are exactly what you may expect: They're double the resolution and pixel density of non-Retina Macs. For a Retina MacBook Pro, full screen grabs are 2880×1800, with the pixel dimensions of elements double the size. When overlaid with a screenshot of a non-Retina Mac, so that they're both the same physical size, the elements on the ...


3

Try increasing the pixel count: if your image is 450px wide, double it to 900 and then downsample at the time of export. This will give you more pixels to work with when describing the curves and diagonals. As an aside, in computer graphics--especially games--you may have encountered anti aliasing methods such as "2x FSAA" What this means is that the ...


3

Ok, there are several possibilities. You can try to identify source of your problem using a list of possible causes or jump directly to different approach I would suggest. List of possible causes What software are you using to create this logo? If you use vector SW like Illustrator I would suggest recreating it in Photoshop since rules that usually mean ...


3

Try to save via Export function - you will see the options for PNG including anti-aliasing switching off:


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