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20

With a pattern. In this case a 3 axis grid (triangular). Once you know what to draw on each piece, you need to repeat this. You can have and use sub-patterns or smaller ones to be more exact. These patterns are pretty easy to draw, and they are used for example in architecture in different cultures. We are used more to a square pattern, but this triangular ...


15

Hm, of course, rather subjective, but I give you my two pennies. At the risk of tooting my own horn, here are some of my similar abstract scribbles. The image above seems to start with the centre circle, and two flame-like shapes coming from that. The artist has brought in a contrasting/contradictory part to one of them: the "jagged" line at the bottom (...


11

A simple solution for GIMP 2.10 (both under Linux and Windows): Go to "Edit → Preferences". In the Preferences dialog, go to "Interface → Icon Theme". From the dropdown at the bottom, choose "Use icon size from the theme" or "Custom icon size" (and in the latter case, choose your icon size with the slider below that)...


10

The topics are good, but most of these questions are too narrow to be good interview questions. If it can be answered in one word, it's too narrow, it needs to spark a conversation: Instead of "how long did X take", try "Talk us through the process for X, from initial brief to completion". Then you'll learn how they handle projects, how they develop briefs, ...


10

Are you guys scared at all about anyone stealing your art? No. Not scared. It's of no immediate risk to me if someone downloads an image I created. What would you guys do about it if it happens? If there is clear intent to profit off my work, I may then decide to fight it through legal channels. What those channels are depends heavily on your location ...


7

There isn't much you can do to stop someone from stealing your artwork. The only way is to not posting your artwork online. A watermark will not be 100% effective but it will help. I also wouldn't upload 100% quality large artwork. Another more tedious way (only work on personal site) is to split an image into multiple images and place them next to ...


7

My comment piqued my interest so here’s a bit of research. One term for this type of pattern is “diaper pattern”: In masonry, diaper usually refers to a brick pattern of repeating diamonds. This example being but one particular diaper pattern. If you google “diaper tile pattern” you’ll find all sorts of information. I haven’t been able to find any ...


6

After years of working with clients and bosses I have learned to always ask, "Why?". For instance in your situation I would be asking, "What's the problem you are trying to solve with using a photograph?". This does two things: It reframes the question from design specifics to a language you both speak well It reframes allows your boss to elaborate on his ...


6

I have gimp 2.8 on Windows 10 and this is what solved the small tool icons problem for me: open This PC > Local Disc (C:) > Program Files > GIMP 2 > bin, right click on gimp-2.8, open Properties, click on Compatibility. On the settings options select: Override high DPI scaling behaviour. Scaling performed by, scroll and select System, Apply, OK


6

This will be hard work in Photoshop, but fairly straightforward if you have access to Adobe Illustrator... In Illustrator, you can use the Image Trace function to turn an image into paths. This used to be fairly unreliable, but the functionality in newer versions of Illustrator is pretty awesome. The trick is to trace the image into a full colour trace and ...


5

The second image is from the game Firewatch, which was visually developed by artist Olly Moss, of Mondo poster fame. http://ollymoss.com/ This is a form of minimalism. It's marked by strong, geometric shapes and pared-down design elements. Often, a single dominant image stands alone to deliver a powerful message. In Moss' work, bold, layered colors create ...


5

If you're hiring for an Art Director position that means there will be other designers who will be managed by this employee. The Art Director rarely does the technical work but still needs to know about the process and how to get the most out of his team. Even if the Senior Designer will not work in the same workplace, he will still need to work in ...


5

The artist is Simon Stålenhag. http://www.simonstalenhag.se/ Here's the Amazon link to his 2 books.


4

I would try to ask questions that can pinpoint his skills and his critical thinking....Instead of "How long does it take you to complete a project?" I would ask some of the following Last three recent pieces of work he/she has completed or currently working on Describe how would you approach execution of a specific project [insert a scenario here] How well ...


4

You migh show him a few of your recent "jobs" (unless you are working on confidential stuff like upcoming-product-artwork) and let him critique the way they were presented or documented. You might also ask him how (detailed) he will assign jobs, if he is hired as "art director". Maybe he has got a template or a planning-tool that he likes using. I am ...


4

It's not "the grid" - it is anti-aliasing between shapes - anti-aliasing is showing a pixel/half-a-pixel of the blue background. If saving for web, use Art-Optimized anti-aliasing in the Save for Web dialog window. In many cases, simply adding a solid, single fill behind all the artwork will force AI to anti-alias to a correct color. In this case, I'd ...


4

There is no set amount of manipulation or alteration of a copyrighted piece of work that will get you to a point where you can consider the work to be your own or 'safe' from infringing the original copyright. Many people will tell you that there are rules regarding a certain number of 'points of difference' (I've heard 7 and 5 quoted for this number) ...


4

Tough call... I was significantly involved in my son's Little League about 10 years ago, even became President one year. I happily donated design work (logo, banners, program, etc). Once I left the league, I let them keep everything I had created. However, your situation is a little different. On one hand, if they just happened upon your new & improved ...


4

In general... Reduce, refine, simplify. You often need to either redraw the object, or do some work to simplify the image overall. This is especially true if you are seeking to use a 1 color version of the image. You need to add hard contrast overall to ensure the details are seen in a single color. I would choose to redraw the overall image using the ...


4

Read the license associated with any stock images. In most cases, you do not own the copyright, even if you do alter the image some.. and you can not claim the artwork as yours. But again, this does depend upon the actual license granted for any stock images. You could use a couple variations on credits.... Book design: Helen XXXX. Contributing ...


4

I simply feel you've got a couple proportions incorrect. You've "fattened" his head making it seem too large You've rounded his left jawline, weakening the typical "male squared-off" jaw. You've also "fattened" his right hand and forearm, making it seem like a "sausage" So, you've essentially made him more feminine and fat. These items all lend to the ...


4

Inkscape isn't the right tool for your attempt to reproduce that image. It's not theoretically impossible, but Inkscape hasn't easy to use deformation tools for creating the wanted apparent 3D form. In Inkscape you can make a straight plane image which contain that hexagon based structure. Without knowing the exact wanted structure I cannot write anything ...


4

If you are printing these yourself on a home printer, you may already have software that you could use, such as a word processor, like MS Word. Or painting software such as MS Paint. Sure these are pretty basic, but you could use them to layout a simple print project with text and graphics/photographs. If you don't have or want to buy or use MS Office ...


3

Somebody copying your artwork for commercial purposes is about the best thing that could happen to you. Federal Copyright law allows you to sue them for as much as $250,000 if they do it. As far as penniless kids copying your artwork, I would not sweat it. In all honesty, the publicity you get from people copying your work is worth much more than any "lost ...


3

When one focuses on the negative on loss sight at the whole picture. Look at it this way: Your not getting any money for the pictures if they are hidden. Your not getting exposure if they are hidden. If somebody steals them you get free exposure, you aren't getting any money. On the other hand you were not doing so in the first place. So the net result is ...


3

There is no foolproof way to stop it, but one way to limit the unauthorized usage of your artwork is to restrict the resolution that it's displayed in. This seems to me like it would be the best deterrent. If the image is good enough to be seen on the screen, but otherwise useless in any sort of production environment, then it makes people much less likely ...


3

I know you say watermark is not helpful but, did you think in put a signature in the artwork? Is the most popular method for artists in DA. I don't know if it's effective or not. It's fast and easy solution.


3

A traditional method which shares features of those images is wood block printing. Obviously, this is a method rather than a style, but considering the large block forms of single colors, this method is probably the closest. Serigraphs (silk screen) share some features but they are more easily able to use gradients and shading.


3

I doubt it was made in illustrator vector but it could've been. If so it was a very expensive custom job. More likely its a photo brought into photoshop then adjust levels and maybe use the posterize filter along with some hue/saturation techniques for the coloring. To do this in illustrator you just need to draw all the different shades as vectors which ...


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