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3

That's not an easy edit even with content aware filling. It'll never look quite right if you try that method. One possibility would be to make a mask of the foreground objects, and just add a new gradient filled layer as the background. In the example below the mask was made using a combination of the blue channel for the leaves, some manual painting using ...


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I'm literally doing that right now with some stock images. Open in Illustrator, remove the white box behind them, save and close.


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The first step is to verify the white isn't actually part of the artwork. To do this you need to open the EPS in a vector editor - Illustrator or Inkscape. Then check the construction. If there's a white object for the background, merely remove it and resave the file. If there is no white object for the background... Some applications, when saving an EPS, ...


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This is entirely possible in Photoshop. If your label is a Smart Object, then inside the smart object you can put different shapes of labels inside a group, and clip the group to a paper texture. So it's just a matter of hiding the shape you don't want. Then update the Smart Object. You may even be able to modify an existing mockup if you have one, so it's ...


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An answer with several parts: The truth is that if you want real flexibility in making mockups you need to learn a 3D program. Use Blender https://www.blender.org/ that is free, very powerful. If your computer is slow, and I mean, really slow, (Pentium) you can download a legacy version. https://download.blender.org/release/ compare the date of release to ...


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Depending on whether you're happy with a completely de-saturated image or not… Just de-saturate the entire image. There are many ways to do this, from converting to greyscale, using hue/saturation or vibrance sliders etc If you want to desaturate selected areas, use a mask You can then use levels to emphasise the contrast - even right to black & white ...


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Two different problems. For photos of paper documents, it's mostly a problem of "color temperature" (your first image is a typical example), so with Gimp: Open the Sample points dialog (Windows > Dockable dialogs >Sample points) Create a sample point on an area that should be a neutral color (like the paper): Ctrl-drag from one of the rulers....


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