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7

I, personally, would use ink and a roller, or a small pad/sponge, not paint. Ink will go on thinner, cover just as well, and not be tacky. Something like This India Ink. It's opaque, waterproof, and typically drys pretty fast.


5

All books employ Creep. Creep is the process of moving each page slightly closer to the outer edge to compensate for the gutter at the binding. The amount of Creep necessary depends upon the weight of the stock used and number of pages. It's a mathematic formula to determine how much the printing should shift from start to center. I am unclear if you mean ...


4

Ok, just found an answer to my own question, from my printer: "Generally speaking about 25 sheets (50pp) is recommended but we have done as little as 15 sheets (30pp) and because it is PUR it stays together. Anything less should be saddle stitched." This is referring to around 100-120gsm stock.


3

Saddle-stitched booklets have a stitch (usually a metal staple) holding the pages together which also forces the book covers apart into a "fan". The covers require a spine. Add an extra bit of material between them to compensate for the thickness of the booklet. It will more nearly resemble a case-bound book. Score the cover at the appropriate space, 1/8," ...


2

So the issue is that you don't want to use the booklet imposition function (which is what happens when you use the booklet feature in Acrobat or in any of the suggested pieces of software), but instead you are looking for something that will provide perfect bound imposition. Booklet imposition reorders the pages so that when they are folded into a booklet,...


2

So the process of putting your document into booklet form ("printer spreads") is called "imposing" and the minute gutter adjustments needed to account for paper thickness is called "creep." You need to know how thick your paper is in order to set a creep value. For a larger book, the creep can get out of bounds, and you might need to make several booklets ...


2

It has to do with the size of papers available. There are more cheap print shops/copy shops with capability for smaller paper sizes because there is more demand for it. So if your printer prints on A3 medium then it can be folded into a portrait A4, if cut in half its a landscape A5. Many office level printers can do this but printing on bigger papers ...


2

This shift is not caused directly to the binding method, but how your booklet is formed and the type of paper. By booklet, I do not mean your finished product, but how a sheet of multiple pages is formed and bent, and probably how multiple sheets are put together. If the amount of pages is the same in each booklet, the shift will be the same because this ...


1

Yes. Casebound (hard cover) publications require some provision for the mechanical binding method which consumes a portion of the available print/read surface of the page, no matter the lateral placement of the text box right or left. In effect, a single page (in a reader's spread) is simply half of a double page. The accommodation for double text block ...


1

Perfect (sometimes called double-fan) binding does not require signatures, but rather creates a text block for the book from single, unfolded pages. It is a process for applying glue to the binding edges of loose pages to join them with glue only. I am worried that you might be confusing perfect binding with another type of binding. To print sheets for a ...


1

Book or Long Reach Staplers are easily purchased. As for whether your specific printer can do custom folding, you'll need to contact the manufacturer or read the manual. That's more of a tech support question, not geared towards design. And regarding the folded piece not being flat... rest something heavy on the copies for a day or so. They'll flatten out....


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