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15

Centerline Tracing There is a free Open Source tool AutoTrace which is able to perform a centerline trace of a line-art bitmap. Run AutoTrace with at least the following options: autotrace -centerline -color-count 2 -output-file output.svg -output-format SVG input.png We can then fine tune the strokes and add the desired stroke strength.. We may also ...


10

Quite honestly... grab the pen tool and manually trace the paths. It'll result in the best output. Auto-tracing is often not the best option. When you only want paths you can stroke, auto-trace generally fails miserably.


10

Here's how to create something similar in Photoshop... Create a low res, greyscale document and add your text in a layer as a 50% tint of black (the 50% will give the checkerboard effect later). Next add some noise (this will produce the random filled in dots). Go to Filter > Noise > Add Noise and pick a low amount to add (I used 15%) then go to Edit ...


8

Most art will remain vector. Some things like multiple nested clipping paths are painful to do. See example 1 for just one thing that would be hard to do in Photoshop, not to mention how would you edit this in PS? Example 1: This is trivial to do and edit in illustrator but not so easy in PS. The biggest problem is that you need to come up with a ...


7

The most precise way you will achieve a quality 32px² picture is really making it pixel by pixel. The very origins of pixel art came from the need to convey visual information in absurdly limited resolution space. making it in illustrator and downscaling it may result in arbitrary antialiasing that may not look good, mainly in LED panels. the finest way to ...


6

As you put it, vectorizing every pixel makes no sense. Imagine you vectorize every pixel and then resize it. You simply have bigger squares. The exact same thing happens if you change the ppi on an output, you have bigger pixels. You do not need to resample it. You want to get rid of the blurriness. That is a totally different issue. That happens when the ...


6

You can merge multiple layers into one bitmap by selecting the layers you want to merge together and going to: Layers > Flatten Selection to Bitmap


5

Illustrator can do center line tracing much like autotrace. Its not super useful for most things but in this case the image is highly synthetic and it might work. Yor source image is notoriously bad so theres no real way to try this without losing quality, your originals should be better (no need to be so zoomed) Do this: In trace settings disable fills ...


5

Try using Interpolate Paths after your trace, as show here: Average stroke from a fill


5

This can happen when the type is used at sizes not supported in the hinting. It's essentially a display error. When you print it's gone. Even exporting to PNG or jpeg will fix it in some cases. Other than that, the only fix is more complete hinting.


5

That's not a shadow effect as such. It's a Motion Blur. Filter > Blur > Motion Blur... Motion blur applies a blur effect to an object in a specified direction. In this case that direction is horizontal (0º). The screenshot below shows some settings that produce a result that is pretty close to what you are trying to achieve:


5

It can be said to be an (old) alternative to vector. I have used it for some very old logos and drawings, but more recently in signatures. It is not vectorized, and not anti-aliased, so it needs to have very high resolution in order to not appear pixelated. It can only have one color. If you place a bitmap colored file in InDesign, you can actually change ...


5

This is kind of a history thing, I'm sure the mode is being used in creative ways differently that how I describe, but --- In traditional PostScript-based offset (big printing press) printing the imaging is done in one of two ways (to simplify things) -- As a half-tone where a raster image is broken down into dots and those dots are in a grid with ...


5

You can get good results in Inkscape with Trace Bitmap, however that image needs some cleaning up in a raster image editor first. What you could do is open it in GIMP/Photoshop etc, desaturate it, do a levels adjustment to increase the contrast, and paint out all the shadows around the outside with a white brush. Auto tracing works best when you have a ...


4

I sort of fixed it by changing the display method in Photoshop. I had anti aliasing method set to 'crisp' I changed it 'sharp' (or vice versa) and it cleaned it up.


4

You're on the right track, try this out: Lets call the layer with text as "Text-Layer" Right click on Text-Layer and then click on "Alpha to Selection" After the selection, create a New Layer Make sure you are working in this newly created layer and not any other layer (!imp) Now fill the selection with your preferred way Also make sure that newly created ...


4

It sounds to me like you have Step by step selected in the action playback options and maybe Allow tool recording, or perhaps both. You need to go to the Actions panel and: Click the menu icon at the top right corner Uncheck Allow Tool Recording Go to playback options... ( jump to the second image below this one ↓ ) Select Accelerated, if it's ...


4

It wouldn't really add anything. That is what pixel images are anyway, a map of discrete colored squares, exactly the same as if you converted each pixel to a vector square. Take this image from my answer on a previous question asking how to do exactly what you are talking about: That is a 256 pixel square tile increased in size to 6,400 pixels square, ...


4

I believe bmp only supports 8 bit RGB (24bit images) Things can get confusing when dealing with the word "bit" at times. By Adobe definitions..... 8 bit RGB = 24bit image (8 bits R, 8 bits G, 8 bits B = 24). 16 bit RGB = 48bit image (16 bits R, 16 bits G, 16 bits B = 48). Using these numbers, standard RGB images are referred to as 8 or 24 bit. 16 bit ...


4

For Inkscape, there is also a centerline trace extension available on github: https://github.com/Moini/inkscape-centerline-trace (fork of https://github.com/fablabnbg/inkscape-centerline-trace)


4

Convert your document to grayscale. Press Ctrl / Cmd + A to select all. Press Ctrl / Cmd + C to copy the image to clipboard. Convert your document back to RGB (or CMYK if you prefer). Make a solid color adjustment layer. Select the color you want for the lines. Delete or hide the original image. Alt + left click the layer mask of the solid color layer to ...


3

2 bit images 2 bit images are not 2 color images. 2 bits would store 4 colors. Currently the png file format allow several bit depths http://www.w3.org/TR/PNG/#11IHDR. Some good years ago the CGA color mode for monitors displayed a Cyan Magenta Black and White images. Those were 2 bit images. You could convert them to Red Green Black and Yellow. That was ...


3

As it is easy to produce a soft-focus effect as seen around bright parts in the example photo it is very hard to get rid of it if it was an artifact. In this case they probably come from light scattering within the camera lens, or from dust on the optics. We can see this as a soft glow around bright lit areas, most prominent on the "enchanted" blue ...


3

You can re-rasterize the image directly in Illustrator to get rid of the unused part of the image. Take this clipped image for example: With your clip group selected go to Object → Rasterize... Choose your desired resolution (this will rasterize your image to that resoltuion at its current size in your document so make sure it is scaled appropriately or ...


3

Select Invert image in the Trace Bitmap dialogue. Perform the trace. You will first obtain your logo in black (like in the first case). Open the Fill and Stroke dialogue (Ctrl+Alt+F) and change colour of the result to white (or whatever you like). Alternatively: Trace like you did in the example. Draw a rectangle around the inverted logo, but inside the ...


3

Sorry didn't quite understand your question, apologies for the confusion. Anyhoo, here's how to do it. Click Edit > Preferences, and select Bitmaps and scroll down to Import Set up as follows: Now when you import a bitmap, the zoom blur rendering is switched off, so you will be able to see sharp pixel boundaries when you zoom in.raster/bitmap image Here'...


3

A Bitmap is an image where each pixel is either black or white (no shades in between). It is very useful when you are designing for devices that cannot output shades of gray, like dot-matrix printers (labels, receipts) or monochrome LCD displays.


3

You have to install imagemagick Try: convert image1.jpg -colorspace Gray image2.jpg (grayscale) convert image1.jpg -separate image2.jpg (channels) convert image1.jpg -monochrome image2.jpg (black and white)


3

I believe Scott is right when he says the image was created by hand. This technique is more commonly called "Stippling". Most software tutorials found online look unconvincing at best, but the Artistic Halftone by Pixeology looks more promising than other automated options. For Illustrator, you may want to look into Stipplism by Astute Graphics.


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