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23

A few years ago if you had asked this question then the answer would have been a resounding yes! However we've been redefining design styles and ideas lately so it's now a little more complex. Yellow can work on a black background, but it's as much about fonts and where the colour is used that affect the overall look of the site. Make sure you're using ...


16

Here are a couple of things you could do... Stroke the black: Use an outer Glow, this may not work depending on the rest of the design: Stroke all of them, this is what I think I would do:


14

A few precisions on the use of pure black and rich black... Some things are misleading and have not been explained in a very technical way; once you understand how things really work, it's easier to make the right choice. First, black is not gray, it's black. The reason why it may appear "charcoal" on screen it's simply because it hasn't been ...


13

You want the Threshold function. It lets you set a cutoff value, where all pixels lighter than that value become white, and all others become black. The Threshold function can be found at Image>Adjustments>Threshold.


12

I can't really claim to know much of anything about mixing house paint.... It's my understanding though that the mixing system is more akin to a Pantone mix than a CMYK mix. On screen, it would be just a black. It would equate to 0R0G0B so.. black. ---> RGB -- > On press.. it'll get rejected by most prepress departments or at least get changed. The ...


11

Although it was a pretty funny comment, yellow text on a black background is not a designer hate crime. Here are some sites that play with that concept. It's important to note that what you'll find throughout all these great sites is some consistent themes though. They never go full, true black background They never use yellow text as paragraph text where ...


10

You'll want to change your image mode to 'indexed'... and then choose black and white:


10

There is no answer to your question as such: everything above C0M0Y0K100 is darker than process black. However, consider that 100% ink means that your printer fills the entire raster, while 25 fills only a quarter of a raster. This means that the lower the value of your other colors the more uneven it is, so it might be perceived as grainy. So while M100 ...


8

Keep it simple: use a subtle outline on each of the circular swatches. From what I can see, the colour and thickness of the horizontal white line would be great.


7

If you have the capability and the time to experiment, I would try glossy dots on a matte background.


7

Choice of rich black recipe When doing rich black you need to keep in mind it will have a tint when used as gray or as a gradient. You might want to use this to your advantage either by using a mix of rich black that will look neutral in its gray shade or by using one that has more Cyan, Magenta or Yellow if you actually want to create a colored gray. A &...


7

To be honest with you, I don't think there's an actual name for it, as it hasn't been separated into a design trend of it's own. However, looking at the photos you attached, I do notice something in particular: The futuristic design that uses white and black is usually very clean looking and give an impression of evolution. You see, we have to look at a ...


7

Ok, I think this question is quite difficult to answer because there could potentially be many variables at play. I'm just going to concentrate on the practicalities of printing the job, so you don't upset your printer with your novel choices of mixes for rich black. I assume, it's four colour process offset lithography. It might depend on the press and ...


6

If you have Acrobat Pro, yes you can. I don't believe Acrobat Reader has this function. (These instructions may vary depending on which version of Acrobat you use. I'm using Adobe CC 2015) Open the PDF in Acrobat Pro. Under the "Tools" menu (top left), choose "Print Production", which is under the "Protect and Standardize" section: From the list on the ...


6

Simple answer: Don't use the [Registration] swatch in InDesign*. Registration black is 100% of all inks. It should only ever be used in registration marks used to reference the alignment of the different inks or plates used. Don't ever use registration black in your artwork. Ever. Your printer will hate you (the man and the machine). A true CMYK black is ...


6

200%-300% Never over 400% sweet spot is ~220-250% Generally you base the % coverage of inks off several factors. Your 4-color proof Paper weight being used <---Most important Paper color (Cyan vs Yellow) <---Most important Press limitations Once you take all those factors into account you can make your black and run some test prints. I don't think ...


5

Your document needs to be in CMYK. To validate this in Photoshop for your document, go to Image > Mode > CMYK Color Now select the piece of text and check you've got solid black (0,0,0,100) in the Select text color window, see image below:


5

The process is called spot UV varnishing. You need to ask your print company if they can do it. Not all print companies have the required equipment. Generally, those printers who specialise in high quality sheet fed lithography often have such capabilities. Basically the varnish is applied just like a regular ink, then the sheets are passed through a ...


4

Rich black should never be used on small text or strokes because of registration between the colors on the press and is a easy way to make your pressman not like you. Single color black shouldn't be used for large coverage areas because of consistency in the black across the area and the depth of the black could be lighter than a rich black. This is ...


4

You can try this: 1 - change the image mode to Grayscale (top menu Image > Mode > Grayscale) 2 - open Image > Adjustments > Threshold. That will allow you to adjust which parts of the grayscale will be converted to black or to white, making your image truly binary. From the Adobe help: The Threshold filter converts grayscale or color images into high-...


4

What you are running into is one of the big differences between video and still photography/design. Video's heritage is television, which has very different technical requirements and standards. In video there is no such thing as #000. In the same way, there is no #fff, no #ff000, no #00ff00, etc.. TV and video standards do not permit levels of 0 or 255 on ...


4

Bar code rule is to be printed from a single process or spot color (100%C, 100%M, 100%Y, 100%K or 100% spot color). It is not advisable to operate them from several colors, because small deviations may occur during printing (couch paper, mapping colors) and this may affect functionality of printed barcode, which would not be readable in that case.


4

That's exactly what they mean :) 0 Magenta 0 Cyan 0 Yellow and 100 Black


4

One is more coloquial. "I want my photo on black and white". Nobody says "I want my photo on grayscale". "Black and white photography", not "grayscale photography". But if you want to get technical, I'll post a list of some terms. Grayscale It is a file of one channel of information. It can be 8 bit or 16 bits, but only one channel. Normally this channel ...


4

photos exported from Adobe Lightroom with an sRGB colour profile. sRGB is not CMYK. Photos should be CMYK to see color more accurately for print production. Chances are if you were to open a photo and merely convert it to CMYK, you'll see the same "dull" blacks. (And you can then adjust the photo for the desired CMYK output.) What is happening with Proof ...


3

I think your approach isn't the right one in this case. To achieve what you see in the second image, I would go for a gradient map on the original image with a gray to white gradient. I'm sure that's exactly how they got to that result. It's easy to do, just add a Gradient Map Adjustment Layer, and choose the colours in the gradient selector. That being ...


3

I'm guessing you used the magic wand tool to select the white background with tolerance set at 32 and anti-aliasing on. If I do that, I get the same result. Instead, set the tolerance to 1 and turn off anti-alias: Here's a comparison of the difference: Zoomed in for better detail:


3

Don't use a black only at 95%.... make 2 different rich black. One could be 40-40-40-100 and the other 30-30-30-90. Personally I recommend you use a bit more Cyan in your recipes rather than making all your CMY values equal: if the printer is not well calibrated (or is digital), a black with more cyan will still look steel black and not dark brown (eg. ...


3

The little solid circle next the to the red box on the right indicates the layer has some Appearance attributes applied to it. Most likely a stroke is applied to the layer via the Appearance Panel. Remove that.


3

For your image I would use Channels. Go into your channels and notice the red one has the best contrast. Duplicate that channel and then use the Curves to adjust it. At the bottom of the Curves panel you can eyedrop the black point to your text and the white point to the background. Maybe tweak it a little. You get pretty close already. Might have to do the ...


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