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35

Yes, ideally all files that need bleed should have it on all sides. The bleed is an extra area that you add to your design to make sure there's no "white border" once the card or flyer is cut. The cutters that print shop use is not 100% perfect, pages might not be aligned or printed perfectly; when you add bleed, you make sure there's color everywhere no ...


35

Not only you need bleed, but you need to consider if you need to shift the image a bit away from the borders depending on the binding method you are using. Saddle stitching binding allows the book to lay flat when it is open. The content that is close to the inside edge of the book will be visible. This method of binding is usually expensive. Perfect ...


16

The purpose of bleed is to mitigate imprecision. The printer "may cut 1/16 inch off the pages" means that the printer will not guarantee that their cutter will be accurate within 1/16 plus or minus (a 1/8 inch range). So the question for you is not about cutting too much off, but whether you will be happy with a sliver of white paper showing when they don't ...


11

Bleed and slugs are meant to be cut off after printing. Therefore you don't want them on the page. By being outside the InDesign page definition, it should make it clear that when printed, only the actual page will be seen. When you export to a press-ready PDF or output the InDesign file with printer's marks, the additional areas for bleed and slug are ...


10

I’m not sure I fully understand your problem. If you create a document with Facing Pages in InDesign and specify a bleed of, say, 3mm, then that bleed will be there on all four sides of each individual page if you export as pages, rather than spreads. To illustrate: Set up your document with page settings like these   Make a spread with an image ...


10

The menus have changed a bit in 0.92, but the extension is still there. Click Extensions > Render > Layout > Printing marks


9

My guess: their bindery equipment cannot guarantee to fold/score exactly on the line between your colored spine and the white cover(s). Same thing applies in three-fold brochures. I call it a "design element on fold." It requires hairline bindery precision, which is rare if not impossible (which is why we have margins & bleeds).


8

What I do in that situation is use the clone stamp tool and expand what's missing on the picture, in the most natural way possible. It's ok if it's not perfect since it's in the bleed zone and printers rarely really use that area outside the edge, even though it has to be there, just in case. In general, printers can accept smaller bleed, as long you have ...


7

A commercial printer can not print right to the edge of a sheet of paper. In other words, there's really no such thing as "borderless" printing on a commercial press. In order to combat this, you print a little over the edge of the design on larger stock (paper). This is called a bleed. If you have content that you want to be right at the edge of a design (...


6

A bleed is needed whenever any ink is intended to align with the edge of the printed sheet. You can't print extactly to an edge. What a bleed does is print beyond the edge so that when the sheet is trimmed everything is lined up. If you do not intend to trim an A4 sheet... you can not print exactly to the edge of the A4 sheet. You would require a bleed to ...


5

When generating a PDF for print production you should first use the PDF/X-1a setting. "High Quality Print" is okay, but PDF/X-1a is much better. It ensures the PDF will meet standard requirements for press in terms of color, flattening, etc. It is also important to always select the Crop Marks option unless you're asked not to specifically. Crop marks tell ...


5

You are right, if you design a simple text document, there really is no need (or even use) for bleed. Bleed exists for non-white backgrounds. Because printing onto the edges of paper exactly is not possible. So when you just want to print something on A4 on your desktop printer, be it a contract or a shopping list, bleed is useless.


5

The bleed needs to go 3mm over the edge of the cut lines. It says so on your template. So for example, if the entire finished work is to be overprinted in blue, drop some guides 3mm from the cut edges, and draw your filled blue shape using these. This is only a rough example, you can measure it accurately using the rulers, but I'm sure you get the general ...


4

Crop marks are automatically created during pdf export. You just gotta make sure you enable it in the export settings. Exporting can be found in: File > Export or Ctrl+E ( Cmd+E in mac ) When you are exporting a pdf, you gotta go to Marks and bleeds and select Crop marks. You may also need to select Use document bleed settings.


4

Unless i am missing something here... do use spreads and export as single pages, which should add bleed on all sides. Assuming you have a facing pages document set up with the same bleed amount for all sides (eg. 3mm) by default InDesign will export as single pages with bleed on all sides. If you want the inside bleed to be omitted, edit your bleed settings ...


4

There's really no issue.... you may be overthinking this. I do that at times :) (related but with facing pages https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/a/37956/3270 ) It's the same with or without facing pages. You do not need facing pages, In fact, I've created more multipage files in my career than I could possibly count and I never use facing pages. If ...


4

None. Bleed is exclusively needed for print work. It is needed for inconsistencies in trimming so that you don't see paper edges when the artwork is trimmed. See How can I determine how much bleed to use? The Facebook image size guides you're reading have a range of sizes with different base sizes to the sizes they're shown at because the same image is ...


4

But he is asking me to create a one-eighth-inch bleed and crop marks. 0.125 inch is indeed 1/8 inch, the PSD/X-1a:2001 PDF preset doesn't include crop marks by default though. Just go to "Marks and Bleeds" and check "Trim Marks". Done.


4

Bleeds do not have to follow shapes exactly. They simply need to be a minimum distance from the artwork. Factor .25" outside the circle and then run the bleed as a rectangle to that distance. It will be greater in the area of the vertical strip, but that won't matter. In this case, just extend the strip edges making certain the circle cuts into the strip ...


3

I can't answer with certainty, as I've never done design for custom printed vinyls like this, but I would assume the printer might want one big canvas with the "cut" lines on a seperate layer in this case. That would essentially allow him to cut each stair with 1 knife move. Your top and bottom bleeds between individual stairs don't sound necessary(because ...


3

You don't need to do anything other than ensure the bleeds are set in the Document Set Up and you include bleeds when exporting to PDF. Just place the image (or whatever) across the gutter of the facing pages. When you output facing pages to a standard single page press-ready PDF the bleed will be added to the gutter area. You simply don't see the bleed ...


3

Printing multiple pages of a publication at once is called a signature. How large of a signature you need, what kind of bleeds and what kind of crop marks are all questions you need to ask your printer as it's going to vary from printer to printer. Typically, these are all things your printer would do for you (and prefer to do for you as they are the ...


3

From a regular printers perspective, bleed is always measured from trim.


3

I've never seen bleed measured from safe. In my experience, it's always measured from trim, and typically from 3mm to 6mm. As Scott has said, additional bleed usually won't be an issue.


3

Converted to a comment per request: You should really consult your printer on what they prefer. They may even have a template. Some questions you should consider when deciding a bleed for a banner you print yourself: Is this going to be grommeted? Is the banner going to be hemmed? Is this banner going into a frame? Is this banner going into a lighted ...


3

In order to print right to the edge of the paper, a desktop printer has to enlarge the image slightly so it's slightly larger than the paper. The documentation and print UI usually call this "borderless" printing, and it's only on printers intended for photographic printing. Office printers, as a rule, aren't designed for it. The reason is that no desktop ...


3

No, pages cannot have different bleed margins compared to other pages in the same document. Bleed is a property of the document preferences, hence it can only be set for the document globally. Apart from that, I also wonder why one would need to set different bleed margins on different pages?


3

The "grabbers" you refer too aren't something you need to worry about. The printer (the person, not the machine) will print your artwork on sufficiantly oversized stock. All you need to worry about is supplying your artwork with enough bleed so that your print can be trimmed to the correct size after printing. The amount of bleed you need is something you ...


3

Saying that Indesign does deliberately set up bleed on the inside is quite not right: bleeding is set up by user. As you pointed it out, it is possible - and easy - to export a PDF without inside bleed. If your document is printed by a professional printer, you shouldn't care about inside bleed. While imposing your document, the printer will deal with it. ...


3

There's a few issues I can see here... Why the inside bleed is taken from the opposite page, and Why an inside bleed would be needed at all when you're working with spreads. Obviously if you set the inside bleed to 0 then this isn't an issue. If you set the inside bleed to 3mm then this happens because you set the inside bleed to 3mm, it's as simple as ...


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