9

RGB or CMYK blending modes reflect what is possible in real world use. Many blending modes rely on the interaction of light though colors. RGB is an additive color model - adding all colors together produces white. (add to get white). Because of how RGB colors work, it's possible to "filter" one aspect of a color and allow light to pass through the ...


7

There's no default method. However, if you choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts, then select the Tools option, you can configure your own shortcuts for blending modes. There is an issue where the blend mode won't move off of Normal with the Next and Previous commands. And it won't switch back to Normal when using Previous and Next commands. So you need to ...


6

Select all objects that you want changed; Open your Swatches palette and click the New Colour Group button, a folder icon, on the bottom; Click on the folder icon in front of the swatches folder that was just created; The icon to the left of the New Colour Group icon shoudl change into Edit or Apply Color Group, a colour wheel icon. Click that; In the ...


6

Set the blend mode of the magenta layer from 'Normal' to 'Multiply' and its opacity back to 100%. This will cause the colour values of both layers to be added together, resulting in a bright red. You can find blend modes in the Layers palette, right next to the Opacity. Do note that blend modes work differently depending on your document's colour mode (...


6

Another method that may be of interest to more advanced users would be through channel activation/de-activation. In CMYK if you have a layer 100% Yellow and another layer 100% Magenta on top of it you could go into the Blending options of the Magenta layer and deactivate the Yellow Channel for perfect mixing. Likewise if the Yellow was on top you could turn ...


6

The equivalent in Inkscape is an extension called Interpolate. From the main menu it's located at Extensions > Generate from Path > Interpolate. You need to have two paths selected to use it. Shapes such as circles, polygons, or rectangles need to be converted to paths first, using Path > Object to Path Example: Edit: Please note however: I can think of ...


5

I found out the answer by testing. Blending with an empty adjustment layer is exactly the same as blending with itself duplication. So the result of Multiply is, colour of itself (0 to 255) * colour of itself (0 to 255) / 255.


5

These answers are not quite correct (at least not anymore). SVG actually does support some blending modes using the feBlend filter. You'll probably have to edit the actual SVG code of the file though. What you need to do is add a <feBlend> filter. See this article for more info: SVG Blend Modes As you might suspect, SVG does have its own ...


5

This is because the colour overlay's blending mode (or any layer effect's) is a standard Normal. It's rather counterintuitive, but that Normal does not obey the layer's owen blending mode. The overlay you see is therefore a regular red with blending mode Normal. You can fix this by going into the layer effects dialog box and changing the effect's blending ...


5

The difference is the way two these modes behave when a layer isn't fully opaque. Linear Dodge behaves as lowering Opacity in Photoshop, while Add behaves as lowering Fill. I believe they're separated in AE because there's no Fill parameter in it. I think it's the same for Color Dodge/Classic Color Dodge and Color Burn/Classic Color Burn


4

Blending modes work fundamentally different in CMYK vs RGB. This is basically down to the different ways that each color mode works and is why you see the difference. There is more in-depth discussion on the issue in this previous Q&A: Is CMYK mode not ideal for designs with blending mode? The reason it is always printing as you see it in CMYK is ...


4

You can use the blend tool. Go to Object>Blend>Blend Options Then from the drop down list select Specified Steps and then in the adjacent cell type 1. Then on the left panel choose blend tool Then click each object with the two colours, you will get an average of that object's shape and colour. Then you can use the colour picker to get the desired ...


4

Select all objects which should be changed and open Edit > Color > Change Color (or something similar, currently I'm working on a german workspace) Does that the trick for you?


4

I'd say it's probably a waste of time and not worth the effort. The top image is such poor quality that it's unusable anyway. Instead, just find a white painted wood panel (or take a photo of one), paste it as a new layer on top of your texture layer, and set the layer blending mode to multiply. Example


4

You can simply overlay a texture and then reduce the fill of the texture to get the image to show through. First I create a mask around my image, then I place the texture and reduce its fill. I encourage you to play around with the blending modes to get different results. Here's an example with the texture desaturated and the mode set to Hard Light.


3

The easiest way would be to open up the PSD and use the colour picker tool to sample the pixels you're after, and use that colour for the inner shadow in CSS.


3

If you're trying to use the multiply layer effect without using CSS then you will have to save as a flattened image and not just saving the individual layer. So if Layer 2 has the multiply blending mode which goes over Layer 1. Then you will need to save the image with both Layer 1 & 2 showing.


3

This shortcut works in Illustrator CC on Mac (and PC I'm told) so I hope it works for other versions too. Click on the drop down menu where it says Normal.With your mouse still over Normal just move it slightly and click and the drop down button should show a golden border around it. Once it shows that you can cycle through the blend modes with arrow keys, ...


3

.svg does not support everything that Illustrator has to offer, unfortunately. It might be wise to actually save your files in the native *.ai format to retain everything you did, and export them as *.svg only if you really need to. And yes, that may mean that you lose some effects in the *.svg. If you want the *.svg to show identically to the *.ai, you ...


3

First, you should be using overprint preview rather than multiply. Just be sure the overprint settings are correct for each ink. Second, you don't have to do anything. Just print it and the substrate and ink will do the rest ... again, assuming your overprint settings are correct.


3

Multiply will give you an ok feel of how dark the colors will get on non-white cardboard. For prepress you can remove the effect. Also with some cardboard colors might bleed a lot, so fine details might get lost. Discuss your preview with your printer to avoid surprises.


3

The isolation property creates a new stacking context for the blending modes you have applied, so any child elements will only blend up to the element set to isolate. In your case you can simply set isolation: isolate; on the SVG itself (since your background is outside of the SVG). As a quick example take this SVG, which looks something like this (cut ...


3

It works because Photoshop's adjustment layers are in essence a non destructive copy of the layers below. Then by changing the layer mode to multiply, you are basically multiplying the image with itself. It's quite a neat trick especially if you want to employ a non-destructive work flow. This also works with other adjustment layers where you make no layer ...


3

If you want to reblend in Photoshop the merged layer and the original background to recreate the original foreground layer and use normal 8 bit colors, the answer is "It's not possible" But 16 bit colors have the needed headroom. The following image has a foreground which is only one color and varying opacity. The image mode is 16 bit RGB. Probably you ...


2

Maybe. Sort of. The maths for blending modes probably doesn't fit exactly what you're after. Difference is the same as XOR, and I think Screen the closest you'll get to addition. Screen Blending Mode Difference Blending Mode You should be able to set up the compositing you're after by setting a group blending mode. If you're after specific and precise ...


2

Correct, blending modes have no effect outside of Photoshop. You can not save images with blending modes. It is simply not possible.


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